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Deaf Authors

The HeART of Deaf Culture
Summary: 

Multimedia interactive 2-DVD set exploring Deaf Visual Art, ASL and English literature, Deaf theater and Deaf cinema. Includes in-depth interviews with Deaf scholars and creators from each genre. Disc 1 plays on the computer and includes summary texts for the interviews found on Disc 2. Disc 1 features interactive timelines and sample works from each genre with text and video files. The interviews on Disc 2 can be used for receptive practice.

Author: 
Rochester Institute of Technology
Imprint: 
Rochester, NY: Rochester Institute of Technology, c2012
Madness in the Mainstream
Summary: 

Deaf and hard of hearing students are often placed in mainstream educational settings in accordance with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Many of these students succeed in what's considered the Least Restrictive Environment of the mainstream. Or do they? Madness in the Mainstream is a rare account of what goes on behind the scenes. Deaf author Mark Drolsbaugh pulls no punches as he reveals the consequences of life in the mainstream for deaf and hard of hearing students.

Author: 
Mark Drolsbaugh
Imprint: 
Spring House, PA: Handwave Publications, c2013
Ann Silver : One Way, Deaf Way
Summary: 

Ann Silver: One Way, Deaf Way gives you entry into the life and art of an incredible woman who has done much with her life. She has traveled the world. She has met several presidents and prime ministers. She has charmed her way into situations and into places few would imagine possible for anyone. To say that she is a remarkable person is to miss the mark. While barely 20 and an undergraduate, along with a few others, she started the Deaf Art Movement. By 25 her artwork had been published in over 10 books. By 40 she had created an international symbol of sign language interpreting, and had her design work published on over 2000 book covers. By 45, after rededicating her life to studio art, she had completed over 150 pieces and defined a new art genre: Deaf Pop Art. She has taken more photographs of famous people using the ILY sign than most people can name. This book is an art biography because it is about her art, but it is also about her life. It reads in chronological format, starting with her birth and leads the reader through various stages in her life and artwork up to the present.

Author: 
James W. Van Manen
Imprint: 
Seattle, WA: Empyreal Press, c2012
Deaf American Prose 1980 - 2010
Summary: 

In Deaf life, the personal narrative holds sway because most Deaf individuals recall their formative years as solitary struggles to understand and to be understood. Few deaf people in the past related their stories in written form, relying instead on a different kind of “oral” tradition, that of American Sign Language. During the last several decades, however, a burgeoning bilingual deaf experience has ignited an explosion of Deaf writing that has pushed the potential of ASL-influenced English to extraordinary creative heights. Deaf American Prose: 1980–2010 presents a diverse cross-section of stories, essays, memoirs, and novel excerpts by a remarkable cadre of Deaf writers that mines this rich, bilingual environment.

The works in Deaf American Prose frame the Deaf narrative in myriad forms: Tom Willard sends up hearing patronization in his wicked satire “How to Write Like a Hearing Reporter” Terry Galloway injects humor in “Words,” her take on the identity issues of being hard of hearing rather than deaf or hearing. Other contributors relate familiar stories about familiar trials, such as Tonya Stremlau’s account of raising twins, and Joseph Santini’s short story of the impact on Deaf and hearing in-laws of the death of a son. The conflicts are well-known and heartfelt, but with wrinkles directly derived from the Deaf perspective.

Author: 
Jennifer Nelson and Kristen Harmon, editors
Imprint: 
Washington, D.C.: Gallaudet University Press, 2012
Deaf American Prose 1830-1930
Summary: 

This new anthology showcases the works of Deaf writers during a critical formative period in their history.  From 1830 to 1930, these writers conveyed their impressions in autobiographies, travel narratives, romances, nonfiction short stories, editorials, descriptive pieces, and other forms of prose. The quick, often evocative snapshots and observations featured here, many explicitly addressing deafness and sign language, reflect their urgency to record Deaf American life at this pivotal time. Using sensory details, dialogue, characterization, narrative movement, and creative prose, these writers emphasized the capabilities of Deaf people to counter events that threatened their way of life.

Author: 
Jennifer L. Nelson and Kristen C. Harmon, editors
Imprint: 
Washington, D.C.: Gallaudet University Press, 2013
image of the cover of my life with kangaroos
Summary: 

Doris Herrmann was born deaf in 1933 in Basel, Switzerland, and from the age of three, she possessed a mystical attraction to kangaroos. She recalls seeing them at that age for the first time at the Basel Zoo, and spending every spare moment visiting them from then on. Eventually, her fascination grew into passionate study of their behavior. Her dedication caught the attention of the zookeepers who provided her greater access to these extraordinary animals. Despite her challenges with communication, Herrmann wrote a scientific paper about the kangaroo's pouch hygiene when raising a joey. Soon, experts from around the world came to visit this precocious deaf girl who knew about kangaroos.

Herrmann appreciated the opportunities opening up to her, but her real dream was to travel to Australia to study kangaroos in the wild. For years she worked and yearned, until Dr. Karl H. Winkelsträter a renowned authority on kangaroos, suggested an independent study in Australia at a place called Pebbly Beach. In 1969, at the age of 35, Herrmann finally traveled to the native land of kangaroos. During the next four decades, she would make many more trips to observe and write about kangaroos.

My Life with Kangaroos explores every facet of Herrmann's connection to these engaging marsupials. Her single-minded devotion not only made her a leading self-made scholar on kangaroos, it transformed her own personality and her relationships with others. As she forged bonds with kangaroos named Dora, Jacqueline, Manuela, and many others, she engendered great affection and respect in the people around her, truly a remarkable story of success.

Author: 
Doris Herrmann ; with Michael Gaida and Theres Johl ; translated by Paul Foster
Imprint: 
Washington, D.C.: Gallaudet University Press, 2013
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