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Teacher Resources

The Bart and Amy Show: The Gingerbread Man
Summary: 

The Comprehensive Educational Resource Center at the Tennessee School for the Deaf produced this series of programs. Bart and Amy are signing bears made by Quiet Bears in Ventura, California. They read aloud and sign books. The purpose of the program is to provide a high interest method of introducing books to pre-school and elementary level children. The program is designed to be a catalyst for reading and conversation between parent and child and for classroom discussion.

Author: 
Tennessee School for the Deaf
Imprint: 
Knoxville, Tenn. : Tennessee School for the Deaf, 2013, 1988
Access for All: Integrating Deaf, Hard of Hearing, and Hearing Preschoolers
Summary: 

This DVD presents child care providers, other early childhood educators, and administrators considering an integrated child care setting, exactly what is necessary to integrate a deaf or hard of hearing child into a mainstream child care setting. It is divided into three parts:

1. Info on Deafness (28 min.): Facts about Deaf people, their language and culture; audiological aspects of hearing loss; and use of assistive devices.

2. Interagency Collaboration (20 min.): Components needed to establish and implement formal relationships between local agencies serving Deaf and hard of hearing children and early education programs.

3. Inclusion and Adaptation (23 min.): Environmental modifications needed to make early childhood programs accessible for Deaf and hard of hearing children.

* A book by the same title is also available.

Author: 
Gail Solit, Maral Taylor, & Angela Bednarczyk
Imprint: 
Washington, DC : Gallaudet University, 1992
Literacy: Share the Word
Summary: 

Teleconference taped from live broadcast from Gallaudet University on Nov. 13, 1996. Panels composed of parents and professionals share strategies on how to increase the literacy skills of deaf and hard of hearing children. Through videotaped demonstrations, viewers will learn how to read aloud to deaf and hard of hearing children using techniques based on current research into how deaf parents read to their children. Accompanying packet of written materials available.

Author: 
Gallaudet
Imprint: 
Washington, D.C. : Gallaudet University Television, 2013, 1996
Working Text: Teaching Deaf and Second-Language Students to Be Better Writers
Summary: 

After teaching developmental writing to deaf students for may years, Sue Livingston found that students who can read and analyze written texts become better writers. They achieve their improvement by reading, then writing about what they have read. Livingston has embodied her successful approach in Working Text: Teaching Deaf and Second-Language Students to Be Better Writers.

In this straightforward instructional book, Livingston first explains what is involved and why her methods work with deaf students, second-language students, and other students who need to improve their writing ability. Upon this foundation, Working Text delineates how to teach students to write through reading and writing exercises. These exercises have been carefully crafted using the X-Word Grammar approach to help students discover common language constructions that they can apply to their own writing. As the students progress, their understanding of the elements of good writing will grow.

Author: 
Sue Livingston
Imprint: 
Washington, DC : Gallaudet University Press, 2010
Deaf Epistemologies: Multiple Perspectives on the Acquisition of Knowledge
Summary: 

Epistemology is the study of how “knowledge” is formed. Standard epistemology isolates the “known” from the “knowers,” thereby defining “knowledge” as objectively constant. Multiple epistemologies suggest that individuals learn in different ways shaped by life factors such as education, family, ethnicity, history, and regional beliefs. In this groundbreaking volume, editors Peter V. Paul and Donald F. Moores call on ten other noted scholars and researchers to join them in examining the many ways that deaf people see and acquire deaf knowledge.

This collection considers three major groups of deaf knowledge perspectives: sociological and anthropological, historical/psychological and literary, and educational and philosophical. The first explores the adoption of a naturalized, critical epistemological stance in evaluating research; the epistemology of a positive deaf identity; how personal epistemologies can help form deaf education policies; and valuing deaf indigenous knowledge in research. The next part considers dueling epistemologies in educating deaf learners; reforms in deaf education; the role of deaf children of hearing parents in creating Deaf epistemologies; and the benefit of reading literature with deaf characters for all students. The final part explores the application of the Qualitative-Similarity Hypothesis to deaf students’ acquisition of knowledge; a metaparadigm for literacy instruction in bilingual-bicultural education; collaborative knowledge-building to access academia; and examination of the benefits and disadvantages of being deaf.

Author: 
Peter V. Paul, Donald F. Moores, editors
Imprint: 
Washington, DC : Gallaudet University Press, ©2012

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