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Deaf Studies

For Hearing People Only: Answers to Some of the Most Commonly Asked Questions about the Deaf Community, Its Culture, and the "Deaf Reality": Student's Workbook
Summary: 

For Hearing People Only: Student’s Workbook can be used for either self-guided instruction or in conjunction with a formal high-school or college course. Each workbook chapter, keyed to a book chapter, contains:

• five multiple-choice questions

• five true/false questions

• five fill-in-the-blanks statements

• two or more essay questions

Author: 
Matthew S. Moore and Linda Levitan
Imprint: 
Rochester, N.Y. : Deaf Life Press, 2008
Medicalization of Cultural Deafness in His. Perspective
Summary: 

The first-ever International Conference on Deaf History was held at Gallaudet University June 20-June 23, 1991. The four-day conference program featured speakers from all over the world who shared their research and perceptions.

Author: 
Harlan Lane
Imprint: 
Burtonsville, Md.: Sign Media, c2013, 1992
Deaf Heritage: A Narrative History of Deaf America
Summary: 

Now, Jack R. Gannon’s original groundbreaking volume on Deaf history and culture is available once again. In Deaf Heritage: A Narrative History of Deaf America, Gannon brought together for the first time the story of the Deaf experience in America from a Deaf perspective. Recognizing the need to document the multifaceted history of this unique minority with its distinctive visual culture, he painstakingly gathered as much material as he could on Deaf American life. The result is a 17-chapter montage of artifacts and information that forms an utterly fascinating record from the early nineteenth century to the time of its original publication in 1981.

Deaf Heritage tracks the development of the Deaf community both chronologically and by significant subjects. The initial chapter treats the critical topics of early attempts at deaf education, the impact of Deaf and Black deaf teachers, the establishment of schools for the deaf, and the founding of Gallaudet College. Individual chapters cover the 1880s through the 1970s, mixing milestones such as the birth of the National Association of the Deaf and the work of important figures, Deaf and hearing, with anecdotes about day-to-day deaf life. Other chapters single out important facets of Deaf culture: American Sign Language, Deaf Sports, Deaf artists, Deaf humor, and Deaf publications. The overall effect of this remarkable record, replete with archival photographs, tables, and lists of Deaf people’s accomplishments, reveals the growth of a vibrant legacy singular in American history.

Author: 
Jack R. Gannon
Imprint: 
Washington, DC : Gallaudet University Press, 2012
Language Attitudes in the American Deaf Community
Summary: 

In a diverse signing community, it is not unusual to encounter a wide variety of expression in the types of signs used by different people. Perceptions of signing proficiency often vary within the community, however. Conventional wisdom intimates that those who learned at an early age at home or in school know true standard American Sign Language, while those who learned ASL later in life or use contact or coded signs are considered to be less skillful. Joseph Christopher Hill’s new study Language Attitudes in the American Deaf Community explores the linguistic and social factors that govern such stereotypical perceptions of social groups about signing differences.

       Hill’s analysis focuses on affective, cognitive, and behavioral types of evaluative responses toward particular language varieties, such as ASL, contact signing, and Signed English. His work takes into account the perceptions of these signing types among the social groups of the American Deaf community that vary based on generation, age of acquisition, and race. He also gauges the effects of social information on these perceptions and the evaluations and descriptions of signing that results from their different concepts of a signing standard. Language Attitudes concludes that standard ASL’s value will continue to rise and the Deaf/Hearing cultural dichotomy will remain relevant without the occurrence of a dramatic cultural shift.

Author: 
Joseph Christopher Hill
Imprint: 
Washington, D.C.: Gallaudet University Press, c2012
An Introduction to American Deaf Culture
Summary: 

It is an excellent resource for Deaf Studies, Interpreter Training, and Sign Language programs and for anyone interested in the unique culture of Deaf people. It discusses Rules of Social Interaction, Values, Language and Traditions, Group Norms, and Identity. Complete set of 5 one-hour DVDs

Author: 
MJ Bienvenu; Betty Colonomos
Imprint: 
Burtonsville, MD: Sign Media Inc., c2012, 1985
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