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Deaf in Literature

The HeART of Deaf Culture
Summary: 

Multimedia interactive 2-DVD set exploring Deaf Visual Art, ASL and English literature, Deaf theater and Deaf cinema. Includes in-depth interviews with Deaf scholars and creators from each genre. Disc 1 plays on the computer and includes summary texts for the interviews found on Disc 2. Disc 1 features interactive timelines and sample works from each genre with text and video files. The interviews on Disc 2 can be used for receptive practice.

Author: 
Rochester Institute of Technology
Imprint: 
Rochester, NY: Rochester Institute of Technology, c2012
Mrs. Sigourney of Hartford: Poems and Prose on the Early American Deaf Community
NEW
Summary: 

"Lydia Huntley was born in 1791 in Norwich, CT, the only child of a poor Revolutionary war veteran. But her father's employer, a wealthy widow, gave young Lydia the run of her library and later sent her for visits to Hartford, CT. After teaching at her own school for several years in Norwich, Lydia returned to Hartford to head a class of 15 girls from the best families. Among her students was Alice Cogswell, a deaf girl soon to be famous as a student of Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet and Laurent Clerc.

Lydia's inspiration came from a deep commitment to the education of girls and also for African American, Indian, and deaf children. She left teaching to marry Charles Sigourney, then turned to writing to support her family, publishing 56 books, 2,000 magazine articles, and popular poetry. Lydia Sigourney never abandoned her passion for deaf education, remaining a supporter of Gallaudet's school for the deaf until her death. Yet, her contributions to deaf education and her writing have been forgotten until now.

The best of Lydia Sigourney's work on the nascent Deaf community is presented in this new volume. Her writing intertwines her mastery of the sentimentalism form popular in her day with her sharp insights on the best ways to educate deaf children. In the process, Mrs. Sigourney of Hartford reestablishes her rightful place in Deaf history"

Author: 
Edna Edith Sayers and Diana Moore, editors
Imprint: 
Washington, D.C.: Gallaudet University Press, 2013
Outcasts and Angels : The New Anthology of Deaf Characters in Literature
NEW
Summary: 

In 1976, Trent Batson and Eugene Bergman released their classic "Angels and Outcasts: An Anthology of Deaf Characters in Literature." In it, they featured works from the 19th and 20th centuries by well-known authors such as Charles Dickens and Eudora Welty. They also presented less-well-known deaf authors, and they prefaced each excerpt with remarks on context, societal perceptions, and the dignity due to deaf people. Since then, much has transpired, turning around the literary criticism regarding portrayals of deaf people in print. Edna Edith Sayers reflects these changes in her new collection "Outcasts and Angels: The New Anthology of Deaf Characters in Literature." Sayers mines the same literary vein as the earlier volume with rich new results. Her anthology also introduces rare works by early masters such as Daniel Defoe. She includes three new deaf authors, Charlotte Elizabeth, Howard T. Hofsteater, and Douglas Bullard, who offer compelling evidence of the attitudes toward deaf people current in their eras. In search of commonalities and comparisons, Sayers reveals that the defining elements of deaf literary characters are fluid and subtly different beyond the predominant dueling stereotypes of preternaturally spiritual beings and thuggish troglodytes

Author: 
Edited by: Edna Edith Sayers
Imprint: 
Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press, 2012
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