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Biography

Ann Silver : One Way, Deaf Way
Summary: 

Ann Silver: One Way, Deaf Way gives you entry into the life and art of an incredible woman who has done much with her life. She has traveled the world. She has met several presidents and prime ministers. She has charmed her way into situations and into places few would imagine possible for anyone. To say that she is a remarkable person is to miss the mark. While barely 20 and an undergraduate, along with a few others, she started the Deaf Art Movement. By 25 her artwork had been published in over 10 books. By 40 she had created an international symbol of sign language interpreting, and had her design work published on over 2000 book covers. By 45, after rededicating her life to studio art, she had completed over 150 pieces and defined a new art genre: Deaf Pop Art. She has taken more photographs of famous people using the ILY sign than most people can name. This book is an art biography because it is about her art, but it is also about her life. It reads in chronological format, starting with her birth and leads the reader through various stages in her life and artwork up to the present.

Author: 
James W. Van Manen
Imprint: 
Seattle, WA: Empyreal Press, c2012
Powered On
Summary: 

Powered On is the uplifting, true story of Sarah Churman's amazing transition from a life without natural hearing to a new world of sound. Nearly three decades after being born profoundly deaf, an advancement in technology allowed Sarah to hear the voices of her own children clearly for the very first time. In this deeply personal work, she reveals what it means to experience both sides of a disability-including the remarkable life skills and lessons she gained from years of being "inside herself," the joys inherent in listening, and the importance of tuning out certain noises in the commotion that surrounds us all.

Author: 
Sarah Churman
Imprint: 
Pensacola, FL: Indigo River Publishing, c2012
Moving Pictures, Moving Hands: The Story of Ernest Marshall
Summary: 

An interview with Ernest Marshall on his experience on being the first deaf film pioneer. Ernest explains about how he first decided to make feature films in ASL for deaf people, and he shares his experiences in creating those different films. Ernest talks about his life growing up, and how the deaf people would travel from 60 to 260 miles just to see his deaf film.

Author: 
written by Don Bangs ; a presentation of World Beyond Sound in association with Century Southwest Cable Inc., Santa Monica, Ca
Imprint: 
San Diego, Calif. : Dawn Sign Press, 2013, 1987
On the Beat of Truth: A Hearing Daughter's Stories of Her Black Deaf Parents
Summary: 

As an African American woman born in 1943, Maxine Childress Brown possessed a unique vantage point to witness the transformative events in her parents' lives. Both came from the South -- her father, Herbert Childress, from Nashville, TN, and her mother, Thomasina Brown, from Concord, NC. The oldest of three daughters, Maxine was fascinated by her parents' stories. She marveled at how they raised a well-respected, middle-class family in the midst of segregation with the added challenge of being deaf.

Her parents met in Washington, DC, where they married and settled down. Her father worked as a shoe repairman for $65 per week for more than 15 years. A gifted seamstress, her mother gave up sewing to clean houses. Because of their modest means, Maxine and her sisters lived more than modest lives. When Maxine's tonsils became infected, her parents could not afford the operation to have them removed. For her high school prom, her mother bought her a dress on credit because she had no time to sew. Herbert Childress showed great love for his young daughters, but events turned him to bitterness and to drink. Throughout all, Thomasina encouraged her girls, always urging them to excel. She demanded their honest best with her signature phrase, her flat hand raised from her mouth straight up in the air, “on the beat of truth.”

Author: 
Maxine Childress Brown
Imprint: 
Washington, D.C.: Gallaudet University Press, 2013
image of the cover of my life with kangaroos
Summary: 

Doris Herrmann was born deaf in 1933 in Basel, Switzerland, and from the age of three, she possessed a mystical attraction to kangaroos. She recalls seeing them at that age for the first time at the Basel Zoo, and spending every spare moment visiting them from then on. Eventually, her fascination grew into passionate study of their behavior. Her dedication caught the attention of the zookeepers who provided her greater access to these extraordinary animals. Despite her challenges with communication, Herrmann wrote a scientific paper about the kangaroo's pouch hygiene when raising a joey. Soon, experts from around the world came to visit this precocious deaf girl who knew about kangaroos.

Herrmann appreciated the opportunities opening up to her, but her real dream was to travel to Australia to study kangaroos in the wild. For years she worked and yearned, until Dr. Karl H. Winkelsträter a renowned authority on kangaroos, suggested an independent study in Australia at a place called Pebbly Beach. In 1969, at the age of 35, Herrmann finally traveled to the native land of kangaroos. During the next four decades, she would make many more trips to observe and write about kangaroos.

My Life with Kangaroos explores every facet of Herrmann's connection to these engaging marsupials. Her single-minded devotion not only made her a leading self-made scholar on kangaroos, it transformed her own personality and her relationships with others. As she forged bonds with kangaroos named Dora, Jacqueline, Manuela, and many others, she engendered great affection and respect in the people around her, truly a remarkable story of success.

Author: 
Doris Herrmann ; with Michael Gaida and Theres Johl ; translated by Paul Foster
Imprint: 
Washington, D.C.: Gallaudet University Press, 2013
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