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New Materials

Picture of Philip Bravin speaking/signing, "success" behind a podium with a lot of microphones; surrounded by students
Summary: 

In March 1988, students at Gallaudet University led a successful protest to demand the selection of the university's first deaf president. The Deaf President Now (DPN) movement was a watershed event in American deaf history;­ it achieved self-governance for the deaf community and placed Gallaudet in the center of a national media spotlight. Controlling Our Destiny is Philip Bravin's personal perspective of these momentous events. A lifelong member of the deaf community and proud Gallaudet alumnus, Bravin was a member of the Gallaudet University Board of Trustees and the chair of the presidential search committee during DPN. Although the deaf community had been strongly advocating for a deaf president to lead the university, the board (which had a hearing majority) selected the lone hearing candidate. Bravin recounts the discussions and decision-making that happened behind the scenes leading up to and following the ill-fated announcement. He reflects on the integrity of the process and the internal conflict he experienced as a deaf person who supported a deaf president yet felt compelled to abide by his duties as a board member. After the protests, his leadership was recognized when he was selected as the first deaf chair of the board. Photographs and documents add depth to Bravin's account, many of which will be seen by the public for the first time. I. King Jordan, the first deaf president of Gallaudet, provides a foreword in which he shares his own unique insight into these events. Controlling Our Destiny captures the energy and the urgency of DPN. Readers will understand the complexities of the presidential search process and the cultural and historical contexts that triggered the protest. Bravin's memoir contemplates power, access, community, and the enduring legacy of a movement that inspired deaf people around the world.

Author: 
Philip W. Bravin
Imprint: 
Bravin, Philip W. Controlling Our Destiny: A Board Member's View of Deaf President Now Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press, 2020
Pictures of children actively engaged in learning activities
Summary: 

Spoken Language is a key component of the primary national curriculum and is fundamental to children's language development and learning. The need for teachers to develop talk in its own right and also use talk as a means of learning is central to effective primary practice. In the past, Initial Teacher Education and CPD have focused on literacy (reading and writing) to the detriment of speaking and listening. However, research strongly supports talk as fundamental to learning and teaching. It has also been identified as an area where teachers feel less confident. This fully updated third edition of Unlocking Speaking and Listening tackles key issues surrounding spoken language with rigour, depth and a strong focus on research, providing education professionals with clear, practical strategies for engaging in purposeful talk, while also celebrating children's implicit understanding and love of the spoken word.

Drawing on recent classroom research, Unlocking Speaking and Listening considers what children and teachers need to know in order to develop as effective speakers and listeners. The book addresses:

Planning and assessing talk Drama and storytelling Working with EAL children Developing talk in Science and Mathematics Special educational needs Using technology to enhance children's communication

Two new chapters on the importance of talk to underpin children's reading development are also included.

With contributions from experts in the field, this vital and fully updated resource will help both trainee and practising primary teachers understand and promote the importance of speaking and listening as an effective tool for learning across the primary curriculum.

Author: 
Deborah Jones and Pamela Hodson, Editors
Imprint: 
New York, NY: Routledge, an imprint of the Taylor & Francis Group, 2018
Summary: 

First Things First: Ensuring Auditory Access describes six evidence-based strategies to help educators, speech-language pathologists, parents, and student teachers/clinicians ensure that a child with hearing loss is receiving auditory access to spoken language. The strategies focus on understanding what a child hears and facilitating the best hearing experience for a child prior to and during intervention or teaching sessions. Readers will learn skills related to understanding a child's hearing history and hearing technology (such as hearing aids and cochlear implants) as a foundation for the development of listening and spoken language. Strategies include collecting and reviewing case records, interpreting audiological assessment information, regular evaluation of device function, trouble shooting devices, and working collaboratively with the audiologist, First Things First: Ensuring Auditory Access and forthcoming books in the Listening and Spoken Language Strategies for Young Children with Hearing Loss series provide the how-to and evidence-base for strategies that help children with hearing loss learn to understand and use spoken language. Students, professionals and parents will find the strategies in this series helpful and easy to apply in meeting intervention objectives.

Author: 
Helen M. Morrison
Imprint: 
Fort Worth, TX: Recipe SLP, 2015
Summary: 

Let your fingers do the talking―a hands-on guide to American Sign Language for kids 8 to 12

American Sign Language is an amazing visual language that uses our hands, facial expressions, and body language to express ourselves to those who have difficulty hearing or speaking. Packed with colorful illustrations and reader-friendly descriptions, as well as plenty of on- and off-page activities, the Sign Language for Kids Activity Book will help you feel comfortable and confident signing in no time!

The Sign Language for Kids Activity Book shows you how to communicate nonverbally through easy-to-follow diagrams of more than 180 signs, plus the signed alphabet and numbers 1-100. You'll master conversation basics, including commonly used phrases and everyday vocabulary. Then, you can try your hand at fun and unique exercises, games, and puzzles that will help you put together sentences, practice grammar, improve your memory of signs, and become the best signer you can be.

Sign Language for Kids Activity Book includes:

ASL in art―Illustrated diagrams and descriptions guide you through 180 signs for basic nouns, verbs, and adjectives for topics such as home, school, foods, and more. Say anything―Express yourself with helpful grammar practices in the Sign Language for Kids Activity Book, designed to teach you how to construct ASL sentences for conversations. Sign on―The Sign Language for Kids Activity Book gives you hands-on practice with 50 exercises, practice prompts, games, and activities designed to make signing and reading signs easy for anyone.

Learn to communicate in a whole new way with the Sign Language for Kids Activity Book.

Author: 
Tara Adams
Imprint: 
Emeryville, California: Rockridge Press, 2020
Colorful images of 2 young men with their arms in the air playing sports
Summary: 

The author provides a firsthand insight into his life as a trailblazer who, despite being deaf, became a successful athlete, father, coach, and life mentor in a hearing world. 

From the book cover:

"Lost his hearing at the age of three
Dreamt of being an airline pilot
Came close to racing motorcycles
Became a high school basketball star
Was a multiple volleyball champion
Represented USA Men's Volleyball
Now a well-known volleyball legend
Helped others reach for their dreams
Never learned or used sign language"

Author: 
Brian Ehlers
Imprint: 
Independently Published, 2020
Caricatures of Black Deaf people - some holding signs, others modeling different communication modalities, a man in a wheelchair, etc.
Summary: 

This educational activity book includes the following positive self-image activities: examples of Black Deaf role models and historical events, coloring pages, a social justice word search, an introduction to Black American Sign Language, American Sign Language flashcards and so much more. This book was designed to be a fun educational tool for people 9-years-old and up. It is ideal for supplementing classroom curriculums, after school fun, and independent learning or family fun time. 

Author: 
Lissa D. Ramirez-Stapleton
Imprint: 
Ramirez-Stapleton, 2021
A young blond haired man is looking at a young red-headed girl whose fingertips are covering her mouth. She is looking up at something.
Summary: 

Yuki's determined to keep getting closer to Itsuomi, but she can't help wondering... "Why must the time we spend together always be so short?"  After struggling with her feelings for Itsuomi, Yuki's chosen love, an intense heart-to-heart between the two, sitting against a laundromat window watching the falling snow, has begun to deepen their relationship. But there's still much more progress to be made, and Yuki finds the world Itsuomi inhabits intimidating...How can they keep communicating when Itsuomi drops in and out of Yuki's life?

Author: 
Suu Morishita
Imprint: 
English edition; Kodansha Comics edition. New York: Kodansha Comics, an imprint of Kodansha USA Publishing, 2021
Drawing of a young man with blond hair with his arm around a small red-headed young woman - both enveloped by a ring of flowers
Summary: 

Yuki is a typical college student in all ways but one: She's hard of hearing. A chance encounter on a train leads to a serious crush...but will he give her a chance? Even with a hearing aid, the voices of others are an indistinct blur for Yuki. But she's never let that get in the way of a life arranged around her friends, social media, and cute fashion. She's browsing her phone on train when a tourist asks her for directions, and she's ready to panic...but the handsome Itsuomi steps in to help. It turns out her new crush is a friend of a friend, and Yuki's world starts to widen. But even though Itsuomi-kun can speak three languages, sign language isn't one of them. Can Yuki communicate her budding feelings?

Author: 
Suu Morishita
Imprint: 
New York: Kodansha Comics, an imprint of Kodansha USA Publishing, 2021
Venn diagram in burgundy and light blude on a teal background with the title in white print
Summary: 

This volume is the long-awaited revision of the only textbook on primary language instruction written with classroom teachers of deaf and hard-of-hearing children (TODs) in mind. It builds on the work of the previous edition, describing the experiences of four real TODs and demonstrates practical application of the concepts discussed. Up-to-date chapters on theory of language learning, assessment, and evidence-based practice supplement specific examples of real cases in the field. Avoiding promotion of one teaching philosophy over another, this volume demonstrates the commonalitiesacross classroom language instruction approaches for DHH children and helps guide teachers to enhance learning outcomes.

Author: 
Susan R. Easterbrooks
Imprint: 
Easterbrooks, Susan R. Language Learning in Children Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing: Theory to Classroom Practice Second edition., Oxford University Press, 2021
Picture of the lower legs of people running
Summary: 

Set in futuristic Washington State, two brothers-separated by grief at the loss of their father but thrown together by similar personal experiences-strive against their own desires to seek freedom from what traps them.

Young Julius McLellan navigates his silent world with curiosity and perseverance, but he is driven to anger and frustration when his friends and teachers don't seem to understand the oppressive struggles against a lack of communication in the Deaf world. In high school he throws himself into sports, particularly track. If he can make an impression using his athletic talent, then maybe people will respect him. He clings to his faith, his church, and his best friend, Amy, who is instrumental in helping him. What he doesn't realize is that his decisions are a catalyst for forming a closer relationship with his distant and inaccessible older brother.

Teenage Jeremy McLellan is angry when their father dies, his younger brother becomes ill, and his family relocates to a new town. Any sign of weakness in others infuriates him, including his little brother's hearing loss. Driven by a sense of purpose and direction, he joins the military as a border patrol agent. A series of horrific events causing increased death and loss sends Jeremy on a downward spiral into depression. He retreats deeper into rage and psychosis, which leads him down a destructive path.

But when the brothers' common passion for running brings them together in the Bloomsday race, will it be enough to reconnect them, help them recover from their traumas, and show them that understanding and vulnerability are key for their freedom in resilient silence?

Author: 
Peter M. Quint
Imprint: 
Enumclaw WA: Redemption Press, 2021
The top half of the moon is lit with the rest of the background in shades of gray and black - a ray of light shining at the bottom
Summary: 

Woody Livingston earned a college degree, had a short but successful stint as a prizefighter, traveled to Russia three times during the height of the Cold War, played hockey for charity with the Washington Capitals, and flew a small airplane ... all while being completely deaf and going blind. Before turning thirty, Woody -- struggling to live in the hearing and sighted world because of discrimination he encountered by potential employers -- is homeless, jobless, and at the end of his rope wondering whether life is worth living. Woody realizes he must live by faith and not by sight; to reach out for a different kind of help before it's too late. Until Nightfall is a gripping true tale of perseverance, survival, and triumph in the face of overwhelming odds-showing that one doesn't need eyesight to truly "see."-

Author: 
Woody Livingston
Imprint: 
Rochester, New York: Olive Juice Publishing, 2020
A family of 4 people standing on the side of a station wagon with the sand and beach in the background
Summary: 

Get Your Elbow Off the Horn is a collection of interactions and observations written by Jack R. Gannon, a lifelong advocate for the Deaf community. Warm and amusing, Gannon's stories begin with his rural childhood in the Ozarks and continue through his experiences as a student, educator, coach, husband, parent, and community leader. These vignettes reveal a down-to-earth family man who believed in making a difference one person at a time. Many of his recollections are brief sketches that reveal much about being Deaf--and about being human. From reflecting on the difficult choices parents must make for their children, to recounting awkward communication exchanges, Gannon marries good humor with a poignant advocacy for sign language rights. His stories preserve and share Deaf American life and culture as he experienced it.

Author: 
Jack R. Gannon
Imprint: 
Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press, 2020
Tags: 
A small pink puppy wearing a blue sweater sitting on a large rock with tall green grass in the background
Summary: 

In the tradition of the beloved New York Times bestsellers Marley and Me and Oogy: The Dog Only a Family Could Love , a charming, inspirational memoir about empathy, resilience, kindness, and an adorable deaf blind pink dog. When Connecticut veterinarian Melissa Shapiro gets a call about a tiny deaf blind puppy rescued from a hoarding situation in need of fostering, she doesn't hesitate to say, "yes." Little does she know how that decision will transform her, her family, and legions of admirers destined to embrace the saga of the indomitable pink pup. One of the most anxious dogs Melissa had ever encountered, the traumatized Piglet weighed under two pounds upon his welcome into the Shapiro household--which included Melissa's husband Warren and their three college-aged kids, plus six other rescued dogs. After weeks of reassurance, and lots of love, Piglet connected, gained confidence, and his extraordinary spirit emerged. Melissa soon forged a powerful bond with Piglet, allowing the two to communicate without sound or visual cues. Two months later, when the day arrived to say good-bye to the now dashing, six-pound pink boy dog with the larger than life spirit, Melissa faced a heart-wrenching decision. Could she hand him over to someone willing to give Piglet the full-time attention he required or could she adapt her schedule and her household to make a permanent place for him in her life and work? Of course, the answer was simple: love would find a way. Curious, engaged, and incredibly eager to learn, Piglet quickly became part of the family. What started out as a few simple Facebook posts of Piglet and his pack rapidly evolved into a global celebration of Piglet's infectiously positive mindset. Piglet : The Unexpected Story of a Deaf, Blind, Pink Puppy and His Family fully illustrates this heartwarming story of one special little puppy with a purpose to teach the power of empathy, love, and kindness.

Author: 
Melissa Shapiro, DVM with Mim Eichler Rivas
Imprint: 
New York: Atria Books, 2021
Tags: 
A young girl meets a dragon fairy
Summary: 
A Graphic Novel;  School Library Journal Review:

Gr 3--5--While foraging for ingredients in the forests near Silverleaf village, young Rinn stumbles upon the slumbering dragon Aedhan, who has been asleep and largely forgotten by the village for the past 80 years. Rinn and the other villagers don't know what caused Aedhan to sleep for so long, but Rinn's uncle Erik and his partner Hesekiel (Hese) arrive just in time to help investigate. O'Neill returns to the world of tea dragons in this prequel to 2017's The Tea Dragon Society. Erik and Hese return, as well as a few tea dragons from the original, in their younger years, but both titles in the series can be read independently. Judiciously used dialogue is welcoming but upstaged by the peach- and seafoam-infused artwork. The limited use of lines gives the art a soft and dreamy feel. Lesa, the head village cook, is deaf and communicates via sign language, cleverly depicted via speech boxes rather than the speech bubbles used for audible communication. Rinn and Aedhan discuss gender-fluidity in dragons, and the main human characters appear to be people of color. Fun extras in the back matter include a short note about the relationship between dragons and tea dragons, as well as a one-page tea dragon handbook. VERDICT A serene and delectable feast for the eyes, with a gently shared message about recognizing one's strengths.--Alea Perez, Elmhurst Public Library, IL

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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Author: 
Katie O'Neill
Imprint: 
Portland, OR: Oni Press, 2019. Print.
Summary: 

A significant number of d/Deaf and hard of hearing (d/Dhh) children and adolescents experience challenges in acquiring a functional level of English language and literacy skills in the United States (and elsewhere). To provide an understanding of this issue, this book explores the theoretical underpinnings and synthesizes major research findings. It also covers critical controversial areas such as the use of assistive hearing devices, language, and literacy assessments, and inclusion. Although the targeted population is children and adolescents who are d/Dhh, contributors found it necessary to apply our understanding of the development of English in other populations of struggling readers and writers such as children with language or literacy disabilities and those for whom English is not the home language. Collectively, this information should assist scholars in conducting further research and enable educators to develop general instructional guidelines and strategies to improve the language and literacy levels of d/Dhh students. It is clear that there is not a 'one-size-fits-all' concept, but, rather, research and instruction should be differentiated to meet the needs of d/Dhh students. It is our hope that this book stimulates further theorizing and research and, most importantly, offers evidence- and reason-based practices for improving language and literacy abilities of d/Dhh students.

Author: 
Peter Paul, Editor
Imprint: 
Basel: MDPI, 2020. Print. (371.912 E2449)
Profile view of Alexander Graham Bell
Summary: 

An astonishingly revisionist biography of Alexander Graham Bell, telling the true--and troubling--story of the inventor of the telephone. We think of Alexander Graham Bell as the inventor of the telephone, but that's not how he saw his own career. As the son of a deaf woman and, later, husband to another, his goal in life from adolescence was to teach deaf students to speak. Even his tinkering sprang from his teaching work; the telephone had its origins as a speech reading machine. The Invention of Miracles is an astonishingly revisionist biography of an American icon, revealing the extraordinary true genesis of the telephone and its connection to another, far more troubling legacy of Bell's: his efforts to stamp out American Sign Language. Weaving together a dazzling tale of innovation with a moving love story, the book offers a heartbreaking look at how a champion can become an adversary and provides an enthralling account of the deaf community's fight to reclaim a once-forbidden language. Katie Booth has been researching this story for more than fifteen years, poring over Bell's papers, Library of Congress archives, and the records of deaf schools around America. But she's also lived with this story for her entire life. Witnessing the damaging impact of Bell's legacy on her family would set her on a path that overturned everything she thought she knew about language, power, deafness, and the telephone.

Author: 
Katie Booth
Imprint: 
New York: Simon & Schuster, 2021. Print and e-book (362.4283 B7254i)
Summary: 

The Oxford Handbook of Deaf Studies in Literacy brings together state-of-the-art research on literacy learning among deaf and hard of hearing learners (DHH). With contributions from experts in the field, this volume covers topics such as the importance of language and cognition, phonologicalor orthographic awareness, morphosyntactic and vocabulary understanding, reading comprehension and classroom engagement, written language, and learning among challenged populations. Avoiding sweeping generalizations about DHH readers that overlook varied experiences, this volume takes a nuancedapproach, providing readers with the research to help DHH students gain competence in reading comprehension.

Author: 
Susan Easterbrooks and Hannah Dostal, Editors
Imprint: 
New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2021. Print. (371.912 O984h)
Title and authors printed on the front cover
Summary: 

International perspectives about literacy and deaf students is an uncharted intellectual landscape. Much of the literacy research in deaf education is conducted in English-speaking countries--primarily the United States--but 90% of deaf children live outside the U.S. and learn various signed and spoken languages, as well as diverse writing systems. Many of these children face significant educational challenges. In order to improve the literacy outcomes of deaf students around the world, it is imperative to study how children are using their local signed and spoken languages along with Deaf culture to learn to read and write. This volume fills a void in the field by providing a global view of recent theoretical and applied research on literacy education for deaf learners. Literacy and Deaf Education: Toward a Global Understanding is organized by region and country, with the first part discussing writing systems that use alphabetic scripts, and the second part focusing on countries that use non-alphabetic scripts. Some examples of the wide spectrum of topics covered include communication methodologies, curriculum, bilingual education, reading interventions, script diversity, and sociocultural development, including Deaf cultural developments. The contributors provide the results from literacy projects in fifteen countries and regions. This volume aims to widen the knowledge base, familiarize others in the field with these initiatives, and improve global understandings and outcomes of literacy teaching and learning in deaf education from birth to high school. Signed chapter summaries are available on the Gallaudet University Press YouTube channel.

Author: 
Qiuying Wang and Jean Andrews, Editors
Imprint: 
Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press, 2020. Print. (371.912 L7761a)
Image of classroom teacher in front of a blackboard and two students sitting at a desk with their backs to the viewer
Summary: 

You're a general educator. You teach high school classes. Most likely you've taught some kids with disabilities over the years. Kids who are blind or who have ADHD or who are deaf. Maybe you haven't. Perhaps this is your first year as a teacher. In any case, this year you have a student who is deaf. Maybe you have a pretty good idea what to do. More likely, you don't. It's okay. Don't feel bad if you haven't the faintest clue where to start. This book is for you.Also in this book is a checklist on how you can better include your student academically and socially.

Author: 
Kelly Short
Imprint: 
Charleston, SC: [CreateSpace], 2014. Print. (371.912 S55963y)
Moonlit picture of a young girl on her knees, surrounded by trees, with her hands extended towards a rabbit
Summary: 

In other words, my parents denied my opportunity to thrive, find my own identity as a Deaf person, and explore the world of Deaf culture. And to me, that world was unknown as I was shielded from those opportunities. My parents wanted me to succumb to the hearing world, instead of believing that my deafness could prevail or make me a successful woman in life. It was as if being deaf wasn't good enough for them. It's who I am, this is me. As I became older, I longed for companionship. I've been told repeatedly by many that I'd never find the love of my life. The curse was broken when I got married in 2016, and that love brought me two extraordinary and brilliant children into the world. My name is Avril Hertneky. I was abused/gaslighted/barrier by my parents for 22 years. I decided to write this book for two reasons. Hearing people's audism is real. Deaf people need to tell their own true story to their books about their parents. My goal is to inspire people to speak out and find their identity as a Deaf person. I hope that the hearing community needs to accept the fact that we are deaf and we like this way. I still ccarry resentment of my life to this day. My story starts here.

Author: 
Avril Hertneky
Imprint: 
Hertneky, Avril. From Rejection to Love: The True Story of a Deaf Woman Who Overcame Abuse and Neglect. 2nd edition. United States: [Publisher not identified], 2021. Print.
In the background, a picture of a purple barn roof; In the foreground dry hay. The cover is in shades of red, orange, and yellow.
Summary: 

A bus full of children is taken hostage in this "screaming hit" ( The New York Times Book Review ) from the author of The Never Game and The Bone Collector . Along a windswept Kansas road, eight vulnerable (deaf) girls and their helpless teachers are forced off a school bus and held hostage in an abandoned slaughterhouse. The madman who has them at gunpoint has a simple plan: One hostage an hour will die unless the demands are met. Called to the scene is Arthur Potter, the FBI's best hostage negotiator. He has a plan. But so does one of the hostages--a beautiful teacher who's willing to do anything to save the lives of her students. Now the clock is ticking as a chilling game of cat and mouse begins.

Author: 
Jeffery Deaver
Imprint: 
New York: Viking, 1995
Tags: 
Young African American man staring straight ahead. The name "Doe, John) is written above his head in the background.
Summary: 

Police found John Doe No. 24 in the early morning hours of October 11, 1945, in Jacksonville, Illinois. Unable to communicate, the deaf and mute teenager was labeled "feeble minded" and sentenced by a judge to the nightmarish jumble of the Lincoln State School and Colony in Jacksonville. He remained in the Illinois mental health care system for over thirty years and died at the Sharon Oaks Nursing Home in Peoria on November 28, 1993.

Deaf, mute, and later blind, the young black man survived institutionalized hell: beatings, hunger, overcrowding, and the dehumanizing treatment that characterized state institutions through the 1950s. In spite of his environment, he made friends, took on responsibilities, and developed a sense of humor. People who knew him found him remarkable.

Award-winning journalist Dave Bakke reconstructs the life of John Doe No. 24 through research into a half-century of the state mental health system, personal interviews with people who knew him at various points during his life, and sixteen black-and-white illustrations. After reading a story about John Doe in the New York Times , acclaimed singer-songwriter Mary Chapin Carpenter wrote and recorded "John Doe No. 24" and purchased a headstone for his unmarked grave. She contributes a foreword to this book.

As death approached for the man known only as John Doe No. 24, his one-time nurse Donna Romine reflected sadly on his mystery. "Ah, well," she said, "God knows his name."

Author: 
Dave Bakke
Imprint: 
Carbondale, Illinois: Southern Illinois University Press, 2000
Tags: 
Pink cover with "101" fingerspelled and the rest of the title in printed English
Summary: 

Are you an ASL instructor looking for resources to enhance your students’ experiences in the classroom?

101 Activities for Teaching ASL is designed for ASL students of all ages. The activities reinforce and enhance ASL learning in fun and challenging ways.

Most of the activities involve interacting in small groups of two or more, a powerful way to practice ASL and develop confidence with the language.

The activities have illustrated handouts and are reproducible for the classroom. There is an index allowing instructors to easily choose appropriate activities to support learning in specific areas.

About the Author: Angela Petrone Stratiy, MEd

Angela is a native signer with over 40 years of experience teaching ASL and interpreting. In addition to teaching, she uses her expertise in ASL as a Deaf interpreter, a comedian and a consultant for a variety of educational institutions and organizations.

Author: 
Angela Stratiy
Imprint: 
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada: Interpreting Consolidated, 2015
Geometric design on the top part of the page with the title below
Summary: 

"Interpreters are key members of the educational team for students who are dependent upon sign language interpretation to access the general curriculum and educational environment. This book reports a multifaceted 5-year investigation into the patterns of practice of educational interpreters working in K-12 school settings with children who are deaf and hard of hearing in the United States. The investigation included a national survey of educational interpreters, a national Summit of educational interpreters, review of the current literature, analysis of a national assessment instrument for educational interpreting competencies, review of interpreter education curricula, case study of one interpreter education program, and meetings with state educational agency representatives. The audience for this book includes federal and state decision-makers, parents, educators, practitioners, and other stakeholders."--

Author: 
Marty M. Taylor, Brenda S. Schick, Susan Brown, and Laurie Bolster
Imprint: 
Edmonton, AB: Interpreting Consolidated, 2018
Drawing of a young girl waving. British alphabet letters across the top and bottom of the book
Summary: 

A wonderful child-led book that celebrates Deaf culture and introduces readers to British Sign Language

Marvellously positive and encouraging throughout, this would be a useful addition to any primary school or public library, as well as being useful to help any child understand a little more about their deaf peers. - The Carousel Ava is like any other 7-year-old. She likes to talk and laugh with her friends, is obsessed with dogs and loves being active. Ava is also deaf - and she's proud of it. She loves her deaf community, that she's bilingual, and that she experiences the world differently from hearing people.

In this book, Ava welcomes her hearing peers to her daily life, the way technology helps her navigate the world and explains common misconceptions about deaf people - and introduces some of her deaf heroes who have achieved amazing things. She talks about her experiences at school making friends with hearing children, and teaches readers the BSL alphabet and some BSL phrases.

Featuring photos of Ava, her friends and family throughout, plus illustrations of hand signs, this book celebrates deafness rather than discussing 'overcoming challenges' or 'stigma'. Perfect for readers aged 5 and upwards.

Author: 
Ava, Lilli and Nick Beese
Imprint: 
Ava, Beese et al., Proud to Be Deaf: Discover My Community and My Language. London: Wayland, 2018

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