Professional Development

Body:

Presented by:  Molly Cooke, Carrie Davenport and Derek Houston

Abstract/Description:

The COVID-19 pandemic has seen an unprecedented shift of the workforce toward telework, a change which has the potential to significantly alter the early auditory environments of children whose parents work. For deaf and hard-of-hearing children, whose language acquisition and cognitive development outcomes may be more sensitive to variations in linguistic input, these changes may prove to be consequential. A recent study examining the effects of COVID-19 on gender equity (Alon, et al. 2020) posits an increase of paternal participation in childcare responsibilities in mother-father households due to men having greater access to and participation in occupational fields that would support working from home. In this project, we investigated the influence of the COVID-19 pandemic on parental linguistic input to children with hearing aids. Our team collected and analyzed 13 naturalistic recordings from 4 families of children with hearing aids using the Language Environment Analysis (LENA) system before and during the pandemic. All four families included a mother and a father and were of similar socio-economic status by parental education and income. Automated measures generated by LENA, including adult word count (AWC), female adult word count (FWC), and male adult word count (MWC) were extracted and compared. To account for variations in the durations of recordings, we normalized the measures by hour. There was an increase in average MWC/hr (156.80 pre-pandemic, 228.69 during) and in proportion MWC of AWC (17.81% pre-pandemic, 31.95% during). However, both average AWC/hr (1070.68 pre-pandemic, 773.86 during) and average FWC/hr (837.77 pre-pandemic, 545.16 during) decreased, which could help to explain part of the proportional uptick of MWC. These preliminary findings contribute to our understanding of how the COVID-19 pandemic may be affecting early linguistic environments, which can in turn inform evolving clinical practices relating to deaf and hard-of-hearing children (e.g. increased early intervention coaching for fathers).

Learning Objectives:

· Participants will be able to describe the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on parental linguistic input.

· Participants will be able to describe overall preliminary findings from this study.

· Participants will be able to describe clinical implications of these findings.

Presenters:

Molly Cooke is a research coordinator in the Department of Otolaryngology at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. She joined the research team at OSU in 2019 after earning her bachelor's degree in linguistics from Georgetown University, where she wrote her honors thesis on speech communities among adult cochlear implant users. She now works on projects studying language acquisition in deaf and hard-of-hearing infants and toddlers, particularly using the Language ENvironment Analysis (LENA) system.

Carrie Davenport, Ph.D., is a Postdoctoral Researcher in the Department of Otolaryngology at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. She earned her doctorate in special education at OSU in 2017. Prior to entering the PhD program at OSU, she was the Early Childhood Consultant for the Center for Outreach Services at the Ohio School for the Deaf. Carrie is a founding Board member of Ohio Hands & Voices. She currently serves on the steering committee for Children’s Hearing Language and Development Resource Network (CHLDRN) of Ohio.

Derek M. Houston, PhD, joined the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at The Ohio State University College of Medicine July 2015. He received his doctorate in psychology from Johns Hopkins University in 2000. His graduate training research focused on how normal hearing, typically developing infants segment words from fluent speech and recognize words across different talkers. After graduating, he moved to Indiana University School of Medicine and constructed the world's first laboratory to investigate the speech perception and language skills of deaf infants who receive cochlear implants. Since then, his work has investigated the effects of early auditory deprivation and subsequent cochlear implantation on speech discrimination, attention to speech, sensitivity to language-specific properties of speech, word learning, and general cognitive skills in deaf infants and toddlers. His research in Columbus, OH represents a collaborative effort between OSU and Nationwide Children's Hospital. His work is currently funded by the NIDCD.

Webinar start times (by time zone)

· 11:00 am - 12:00 pm PT

· 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm MT

· 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm CT

· 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET

Where: Adobe Connect- to register click here.

http://infanthearing.org/webinars/2021/increased-paternal-linguistic-input.html

Download the adobeconnect app.

For Windows: http://www.adobe.com/go/Connectsetup

For Mac: http://www.adobe.com/go/ConnectSetupMac

More download information is found at: https://helpx.adobe.com/adobe-connect/connect-downloads-updates.html

Note: If your institution does not permit you to add the above link, you may go to the above URL directly, however, we have been advised that optimal performance is achieved via the app.

Live captioning will also be provided.

This webinar will be recorded and posted online at www.infanthearing.org about a week after the webinar. There are no CEU’s offered for the webinar.

If you have questions about this webinar, please contact Mandy Jay . For technical assistance during the webinar, please contact Daniel Ladner.

There are no CEU’s offered for the webinar.

This webinar is being provided by the Early Hearing Detection and Intervention, National Technical Resource Center (EHDI NTRC) housed within the National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management at Utah State University. The work of the NTRC is funded in part by a cooperative agreement (U52MC04391) from the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) at the United States Department of Health and Human Services.

Body:

Presented by:  Michelle Graham and Cheryl Broekelmann

Abstract/Description:

This session will explore the evolution of using the coaching model as a process to deliver therapy via the internet to children with hearing loss during a time of uncertainty with social distancing and decrease of in-person services. It will apply the components of a coaching model and adult learning theory to Listening and Spoken Language therapy delivered virtually providing continuity of care when a provider can no longer meet in person due to social distancing and COVID-19 restrictions. A goal of the coaching model is to empower the parent through knowledge, development of skills and the confidence to use their skills to improve their child’s outcomes. Parental Self Efficacy (PSE) describes the belief that a parent holds regarding their ability to be a successful parent and their competencies within their parental roles. A parent’s self-efficacy and stress levels may impact their ability to maintain typical routines fostering language development. Therefore, it is important for an early interventionist to consider tools and strategies to help identify and address stressors that may be impactful. Ambrose (2020) states that early intervention professionals should ensure their intervention services use a coaching model that helps parents understand their potential to influence their child’s outcomes, builds PSE, and supports parents’ involvement in facilitating their child’s development. This session will explore case studies of family involvement in early intervention services before, during and after a global pandemic and strategies to address quality of life and PSE through a coaching model.

Learning Objectives:

· The participant will define the coaching process as it applies to virtual service delivery.

· The participant will define parental self-efficacy and discuss the impact on family participation in early intervention services.

· The participant will examine case studies related to intensity of service delivery, family involvement, and quality of life during a global pandemic.

Presenters:

Michelle Graham, St. Joseph Institute for the Deaf Michelle is the Lead Early Intervention Therapist at St. Joseph Institute for the Deaf in St. Louis, Missouri. Michelle is an experienced Listening and Spoken Language Specialist and maintains teacher certification in the area of special education. Michelle provides Early Intervention therapy services to families in person and via internet therapy.

Cheryl Broekelmann, St. Joseph Institute for the Deaf Cheryl Broekelmann, LSLS Cert. AVEd, is the Director of Operations at St. Joseph Institute for the Deaf in St. Louis. She has over 25 years experience as an educator of the deaf. She has presented at workshops and at AG Bell conferences. Some of the titles of her presentations are: “Needs of Parents who have Children with Hearing Impairment”, “Lights, Camera, Action”, “What Do I Do When They Want to Learn About Dinosaurs?”, “Meeting the Needs of Families of Children Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing”, “Demystifying Deafness”, “Preschoolers Rule With The Right Tools”, “Bridging Distances with Tele-Therapy for Children with Hearing Loss” and “Collaboration + Coordination = Communication”. Cheryl has an undergraduate degree in Deaf Education from Fontbonne University and a Masters of Education in Early Childhood Administration.

Webinar start times (by time zone)

· 11:00 am - 12:00 pm PT

· 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm MT

· 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm CT

· 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET

Where: Adobe Connect- to register click here.

 http://infanthearing.org/webinars/2021/plugged-in-continuity-of-services.html

Download the adobeconnect app.

For Windows: http://www.adobe.com/go/Connectsetup

For Mac: http://www.adobe.com/go/ConnectSetupMac

More download information is found at: https://helpx.adobe.com/adobe-connect/connect-downloads-updates.html

Note: If your institution does not permit you to add the above link, you may go to the above URL directly, however, we have been advised that optimal performance is achieved via the app.

Live captioning will also be provided.

This webinar will be recorded and posted online at www.infanthearing.org about a week after the webinar. There are no CEU’s offered for the webinar.

If you have questions about this webinar, please contact Mandy Jay . For technical assistance during the webinar, please contact Daniel Ladner.

There are no CEU’s offered for the webinar.

This webinar is being provided by the Early Hearing Detection and Intervention, National Technical Resource Center (EHDI NTRC) housed within the National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management at Utah State University. The work of the NTRC is funded in part by a cooperative agreement (U52MC04391) from the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) at the United States Department of Health and Human Services.

Body:

On Thursday, June 10th, NCHAM will be hosting the webinar: “Supports and Resources for Implementing Pediatric Tele-Audiology” Presented by: Jeff Hoffman, Bill Campbell and Brandt Culpepper.

Abstract/Description:

The focus on telehealth has increased during the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic as health professionals seek to provide a wide variety of health services while maintaining social and physical distancing. While tele-audiology has been in existence for several decades, there is currently a renewed interest by audiologists to adopt telehealth strategies for audiologic assessments and services.

The National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management (NCHAM) recently completed a tele-audiology project funded by HRSA/MCHB and AMCHP with the goal of assisting audiology facilities that interested in or that are able to begin conducting pediatric audiologic assessments and services remotely.

This workshop will present the historical background of tele-audiology, an overview of the NCHAM tele-audiology project, the survey results of pediatric audiology facilities use of tele-audiology, and strategies to support adoption and provision of tele-audiology. Resources developed for the project include the revised Tele-Audiology Guide, an Introductory Guide, a planning tool and flowchart, five Technical Support sessions, a Remote Hearing Aid Programming Simulation, and a Facebook group.

Learning Objectives:

– List the types of tele-audiology assessments and services

– Identify the factors to be considered to plan and implement tele-audiology

– Locate tele-audiology resources

Presenters:

Jeff Hoffman, MS, CCC-A. Consultant - National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management

Jeff Hoffman, MS CCC-A, managed the Tele-Audiology project with the National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management (NCHAM) at Utah State University. Jeff was the Outreach Coordinator with the Early Childhood Hearing Outreach (ECHO) Initiative at NCHAM for seven years and an EHDI Network Consultant for NCHAM for two years. He also served as the program manager for the Nebraska Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program for six years. Jeff chairs of the Hardin County (Iowa) Board of Health and the Greenbelt Home Care/Public Health. He has served on the board of the Dimensions Educational Research Foundation from 2002-14 and was chair from 2006-12. He also served as president of the Directors of Speech and Hearing Programs for State Health and Welfare Agencies in 2008.

Bill Campbell, MCISc. Infant Hearing Consultant

Bill Campbell is a semi-retired Canadian audiologist. Bill has over 20 years of experience as a pediatric audiologist and was the regional coordinator for the Ontario Infant Hearing Program since it’s inception in 2001 until his retirement in 2018. He continues to be active in the field, consulting to various agencies in relation to Early Hearing Detection and Intervention programs. He remains active in the Ontario Infant Hearing Program as well, providing clinical services on occasion and consulting on program and protocol development. Bill

began researching and implementing remote infant Auditory Brainstem Response assessments through teleaudiology in 2008 and developed practices and protocol in use today.

Brandt Culpepper, PhD, CCC-A. EHDI Team Lead, Georgia Department of Public Health

Dr. Brandt Culpepper is the Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Team Lead in the Division of Health Promotion at the Georgia Department of Public Health. She has more than 30 years of experience as pediatric audiologist in academic, medical, and public health settings with a focus on early identification of hearing loss. She currently serves on the board of the Directors of Speech and Hearing Programs for State Health and Welfare Agencies, is a member of the CDC EHDI Outcomes Committee, and is facilitating the expansion of infant hearing assessments through teleaudiology in Georgia.

Webinar start times (by time zone)

· 11:00 am - 12:00 pm PT

· 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm MT

· 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm CT

· 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET

Where: Adobe Connect- to register click here.

http://infanthearing.org/webinars/2021/supports-and-resources-for-implementing-pediatric-tele-audiology.html

Download the adobeconnect app.

For Windows: http://www.adobe.com/go/Connectsetup

For Mac: http://www.adobe.com/go/ConnectSetupMac

More download information is found at: https://helpx.adobe.com/adobe-connect/connect-downloads-updates.html

Note: If your institution does not permit you to add the above link, you may go to the above URL directly, however, we have been advised that optimal performance is achieved via the app.

Live captioning will also be provided.

This webinar will be recorded and posted online at www.infanthearing.org about a week after the webinar. There are no CEU’s offered for the webinar.

If you have questions about this webinar, please contact Mandy Jay . For technical assistance during the webinar, please contact Daniel Ladner.

Body:

On Thursday, June 20th, NCHAM will be hosting the webinar: "Using Remote Microphone Systems to Improve Listening and Learning for Young Children Who Are Hard of Hearing" presented by Merry Spratford.
During this webinar, we will discuss 1) why it is important for early intervention providers, parents, and audiologists to be aware of the acoustical learning environment of young children who are hard of hearing and 2) emerging evidence showing the impact of receiving remote microphone systems on children's language development.
In most cases, hearing aids are the primary approach to improving auditory access of speech for children who are hard of hearing. However, hearing aids are unable to provide good audibility of speech in environments where noise and reverberation are present or when talkers are speaking from a distance. Personal remote microphone systems have been shown to improve speech recognition by reducing the negative effects of noisy, reverberant room acoustics and distance between speakers and listeners. While most of the research examining benefits of remote microphone systems has been focused on academic settings and school-age children, we will review new evidence indicating a benefit for language development when children receive a personal remote microphone system at a young age.

Learning objectives
At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
1. Describe limitations of hearing aids in providing optimal audibility of speech in complex, acoustic environments.
2. Find smartphone applications to measure sound levels within home and daycare settings.
3. Compare language outcomes of children who received remote microphone systems to children who did not receive remote microphone systems.

Presenter bio
Bio: Merry Spratford, AuD, is a research audiologist at Boys Town National Research Hospital. She has been involved in the Outcomes of Children with Hearing Loss research studies (PIs: Mary Pat Moeller, Bruce Tomblin, and Ryan McCreery) since 2008. Merry currently manages the Audibility, Perception, and Cognition Laboratory (PI Ryan McCreery), which examines how children's language and cognitive skills influence their ability to understand speech in complex listening environments.

When: Thursday, June 20, 2019
Webinar start times (by time zone)
• 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm PT
• 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm MT
• 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm CT
• 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm ET
Where: Adobe Connect - to register click: https://usu.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bfryhd351GcLxit
Download the AdobeConnect app.
     For Windows: http://www.adobe.com/go/Connectsetup
      For Mac: http://www.adobe.com/go/ConnectSetupMac
   More download information is found at: https://helpx.adobe.com/adobe-connect/connect-downloads-updates.html 
Live captioning will also be provided; a link will be available for captioning upon logging into the webinar.
This webinar will be recorded and posted online at www.infanthearing.org about a week after the webinar.
 

Body:

SE DeafBlind Webinar Series

TIME:  2:30-4pm EASTERN time / 1:30-3pm CENTRAL time

ASL Interpreters Provided

Please register by NOON Eastern Time Day of Presentation

PRESENTER:  FRANCISCO MURIEL

Click Here to Register

Body:

SE DeafBlind Webinar Series
Tuesdays and Thursdays
(ASL Interpreting, Captioning & Spanish Interpreting Provided)
Sponsored by the Southeast State DeafBlind Projects

TIME:  1:30PM CST; 2:30PM EST

Preparing for transition is not something that needs to be delayed until the student is a teenager.  There are things that can be done at an earlier age to help build skills for transition.  Learn about ideas and come away with tools to help start this process earlier.

PRESENTERS:  
Corinne Miller, KY Deafblind Specialist and
Janell Turner, Vocational Rehabilitation Administrator

Please Register by NOON EASTERN day of Presentation 

REGISTER HERE:  https://uky.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_ODQHg9YPTE292DptrleS_A

Body:

SE DeafBlind Webinar Series
Tuesdays and Thursdays
(ASL Interpreting, Captioning & Spanish Interpreting Provided)
Sponsored by the Southeast State DeafBlind Projects

TIME:  1:30PM CST; 2:30PM EST

There are many great ideas to support the needs of students with dual sensory loss.  It’s easy to become overwhelmed or not know where to start.  Join the family/educational team from Horry County, SC and learn how they use a team approach to creating meaningful experience books for their student.  Participants will see the process in action; from brainstorming, choosing language and materials, maintaining a shared template, to creating a final product.
Teamwork makes….a successful and happy student!

PRESENTERS:  Krista Olsen, Technical Assistance Specialist, SC DeafBlind Project, Katie Sacra (parent), Horry County Educational Team

Please Register by NOON EASTERN day of Presentation 

REGISTER HERE: https://uky.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_f_uCySaGSTu41STGpm2hEw

Body:

SE DeafBlind Webinar Series
Tuesdays and Thursdays
(ASL Interpreting, Captioning & Spanish Interpreting Provided)
Sponsored by the Southeast State DeafBlind Projects

TIME:  1:30PM CST; 2:30PM EST

We will be discussing some basic principles of Positive Behavior support, including the 3 principle keys: appropriate expectations, engaging activities, and effective behavior management and how to implement these for students with dual sensory loss.

PRESENTERS:  Kate Borg, Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

Please Register by NOON EASTERN day of Presentation 

REGISTER HERE: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_t4n2JvErQZmY-d-koYrdJA

Body:

TIME:  12:00pm-1:00pm CT; 1:00pm-2:00pm ET

LIVE CAPTIONING WILL BE PROVIDED

OBJECTIVES:
• Explore how time management impacts your well-being and personal/family/work balance.
• Learn a variety of easy to implement time management strategies to increase personal and work productivity and improve your well-being.

ABSTRACT: 
Time and energy are our most precious resources. Choosing how, where and with whom we spend these is directly correlated to our well-being. When it comes to choosing what we do during our day, we often equate doing the “right thing” with doing something for someone else. We often choose to sacrifice our own personal well-being to focus on the impact we have on our teams and the system. With technology constantly at our fingertips we often end up blurring the lines between work and personal time.  When we are physically and/or emotionally exhausted, our focus wanes and productivity is reduced.

Self-care has emerged as an important topic in the workplace. Self-care are activities we engage in deliberately to support of our mental, emotional, and physical health. Are our typical self-care activities enough to help us rejuvenate? What are other strategies that we can incorporate into our lives to improve our well-being?

Enter time management as a self-care strategy.

This dynamic session will introduce the idea of time management strategies to provide the stress relief we all strive for. There is no secret recipe for the best way to manage time nor is time management one size fits all, it is about trying a variety of strategies until you find the one(s) that work best for you. Join us, and learn simple, yet effective time management strategies that will help you be more productive and find more time to spend on yourself and your family.

PRESENTERS: Alyson Ward and Terri Patterson

PRIMARY AUDIENCE:
Family leaders, family-based support organizations, Deaf-based organizations, EHDI program staff and EHDI systems stakeholders, and Pediatric Healthcare Professionals.

REGISTER HERE

Body:

In lieu of postponing the 2020 SERID Conference, SERID, INC. gladly presents:

SERID Seminars 

SERID Seminars will provide a virtual opportunity for professional development with unique topics that impact the Deaf, DeafBlind and Hard of Hearing communities.

All Seminars will be from 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM Eastern Time; 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM Central Time

SAVE THE DATES for our first SERID Seminars!

Thursday, October 29, 2020
Friday, November 6, 2020
Friday, November 13, 2020
Friday, November 20, 2020

Each Seminar will offer FREE CRCC and RID CEUs, pending approval

The SERID Conference Has Been Postponed Until October 2021