West

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Along with our informative workshops, we will have artisan exhibits from members of our local Deaf and interpreting communities available. We will be offering a box lunch from Jason’s Deli on Saturday, June 27th. You will have your choice of a premium ham or oven-roasted turkey breast sandwich with leafy lettuce and tomato, chips, pickle and a chocolate chip cookie; vegetarian options will be offered upon request. This year we are doing things a little differently; the choice is yours! For each of the three sessions, you will have two workshop options presented by our very talented and knowledgeable presenters. Here is what you can look forward to:

WORKSHOP SESSION #1
“Hey, I’m looking for…How to interpret those challenging automotive calls.”-Brenda Sellers
This workshop is geared primarily towards video relay service interpreters. This workshop will help you recognize some signs commonly used for automotive parts even though, per our usual, not every part has a sign. This workshop will give an overview of some common parts, their names, and where they are located. Knowing which system the part is in and its function will help you describe it better when it appears during your work. Sometimes we, as the interpreter, need a name with the sign the caller is giving us; I hope to supply you with some of these names and help you become more comfortable
interpreting these calls.

-OR-

“Get Back in the Driver’s Seat - A Roadmap to Financial Success” –Anna Seale
In today’s world, finances are part of every aspect of our life, including our interpreting work. We need to have an understanding of finances in order to be successful in our personal and professional lives. In this workshop, we will discuss personal strategies for goal setting, how to create a realistic budget, how to save, how to understand credit reporting its impact on your life, and debt repayment methods.
As interpreters, many of our consumers are dealing with financial stress. We are interpreting in these situations and about this subject matter. In learning about this topic, we can render messages more
accurately and with more empathy.

WORKSHOP SESSION #2
“Interpreting & Intersectionality: Examining the Place of Identity in Our Work” –Folami Ford
In this workshop participants will examine the role of identity in their work through the lens of intersectionality, simultaneity, and social group identity theory. As interpreters we inhabit any number of
identities beyond that of “interpreter” and these identities can impact how we show up and interact on an assignment. Through various hands-on activities workshop attendees will have an opportunity to
explore the many facets of their identity so that they can become more mindful of how these identities can possibly exert influence on their everyday work. Such reflections will serve to make us more
thoughtful practitioners as we interpret in an increasingly multicultural and multilingual world.

-OR-

“A New Generation of Slang” –Sabrina Smith
Have you ever been interpreting and heard the phrase “Wow, you be channeling the chucks!!!” or “I can’t believe he threatened to steal on her!!” We all experience hearing slang working in the
educational system, the problem is, what do we do with it? This workshop takes a look at slang that is used by the current generation of youth and addresses the issue of what does an interpreter do when
they hear these phrases. Working with younger generations means understanding their language and being able to interpret it effectively. This workshop teaches skills that help educate interpreters on
current slang and what to do when they are faced with terms they are unfamiliar with.

WORKSHOP SESSION #3
“Laying a Strong Foundation: Working from ASL into Spoken English” –Folami Ford
In this workshop participants will have an opportunity to review the building blocks of a successful ASL to spoken English interpretation. Although the literature recommends working into our first language,
signed language interpreters are sometimes hesitant, nervous, or less confident when working from ASL into spoken English. To help participants overcome their own self-defeating behaviors the
following topics will be covered: Gile’s effort model of interpreting, the interpreter’s tool kit, & effective interpreting strategies. Lecture, small group discussion, large group discussion, and hands on practice
will allow the presenter to accommodate a variety of learning styles.

-OR-

“It’s a Touchy Subject” –Sabrina Smith
This workshop is designed to explore subjects in the educational setting that can be a bit touchy to interpret. We will take an in-depth look at Family Life in the K-12 setting and how interpreters can be
better prepared to approach the subject in the most professional way. As interpreters how many times have we been faced with the decision: to expand or not to expand, what exactly is my role here, or how
far is too far? The goal in this workshop is to empower interpreters to take an active role in their interpretation of touchy subjects and get the intended message across to the client showing respect to the deaf/hard of hearing student as well as any professionals in the room. Other subjects such as Science and History are explored to find out how to address the challenges that arise in the classroom.
The workshop will also include open discussion that will enable the group to learn through others experiences. Whether you are a seasoned interpreter or just beginning your journey, this workshop has something for everyone.

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The language differences in American Sign Language and spoken English require that interpreters employ various expansion and compression techniques to achieve message equivalency.  Expansion techniques are
used in order to make implicit information in the source language more explicit in the target language.  If interpreters are unfamiliar with expansion techniques, the resulting work will demonstrate unnatural phrasing, incorrect grammatical structures, and errors in production. The goal of this workshop is to expose interpreters to various expansion techniques and apply, through practice 3-4, specified techniques found in American Sign Language

Registration is Open:  http://tennrid.org/   Then, click on "Events/Workshops"

PRICES:

TRID MEMBERS:
Friday Evening Workshop only $40
Saturday All-Day Workshop only $80
Both Fri/Sat $120

NON-MEMBERS:
Friday only -$45
Saturday only -$110
Both Fri/Sat -$155

AT THE DOOR –REGARDLESS OF MEMBERSHIP STATUS:
Friday only -$50
Saturday only -$125
Both Fri/Sat -$ 175

TOTAL 1.0 CEUS - PENDING

CAPACITY: 40 people

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This workshop will address the very heart of interpreting: Meaning. How do we manage the finer shades of meaning, address subtleties found in language and express the unspoken? As interpreters, we determine meaning through a combination of factors such as context, intonation, intent, setting, and other linguistic features. To accurately interpret we must look past the individual words to determine the intended meaning of the speaker. Sometimes our understanding and knowledge of semantic meaning in our first language does not always translate into the ability to render an accurate interpretation in our second language. Often what remains unspoken communicates important ideas, themes and feelings. Two significant methods used to express the unspoken are implication and inference; we are left to determine meaning when words are not used. This training focuses on our
interpretation from English to American Sign Language and how to gain mastery over meaning.

Registration is Open:  http://tennrid.org/   Then, click on "Events/Workshops"

PRICES:

TRID MEMBERS:
Friday Evening Workshop only $40
Saturday All-Day Workshop only $80
Both Fri/Sat $120

NON-MEMBERS:
Friday only -$45
Saturday only -$110
Both Fri/Sat -$155

AT THE DOOR –REGARDLESS OF MEMBERSHIP STATUS:
Friday only -$50
Saturday only -$125
Both Fri/Sat -$ 175

TOTAL 1.0 CEUS - PENDING

CAPACITY: 40 people

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• Event Open to ALL CHILDREN in costume.
• Parents must accompany their kiddos at all times.
• Hearing kids will have an opportunity to learn some Halloween ASL for trick or treating!
• Adults are invited to decorate their cars and hand out candy with their children.

These are socially-distanced events.

Please see attachment for COVID 19 Safety Rules

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This is the 5th reunion for the TSD Class of 1942.  On Thursday, June 26th there will be tours of the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame, morning or afternoon.  On Friday night, a 2-hr Tennessee Riverboat cruise complete with prizes and dinner will board at 6:30 pm and return at 9:00 pm. On Saturday, there will be both morning and afternoon tours of the TSD campus.  Then Saturday night, there will be a banquet dinner at the Knoxville Marriott at 6:00 pm.  See contacts listed for questions and/or more information.

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This is an opportunity for alumni, parents, families, and community members to share their vision and qualities for the next WTSD/TSD Superintendent. The timeline and process will be shared during this time. Public comments will be considered by the screening committee. 

If you are unable to attend in person, please feel free to send your comments to Kathleen Airhart.

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This is an opportunity for alumni, parents, families, and community members to share their vision and qualities for the next WTSD/TSD Superintendent. The timeline and process will be shared during this time. Public comments will be considered by the screening committee. 

If you are unable to attend in person, please feel free to send your comments to Kathleen Airhart.

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The Senior Class of the Tennessee School for the Deaf request the honor of your presence at the Commencement Exercises, Thursday evening, May 21, 2015 at 7:30 pm at First Baptist Church, 510 West Main Street, Knoxville TN.

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SE DeafBlind Webinar Series
Tuesdays and Thursdays
(ASL Interpreting, Captioning & Spanish Interpreting Provided)
Sponsored by the Southeast State DeafBlind Projects

TIME:  1:30PM CST; 2:30PM EST

Everything we learn comes from a sensory channel.  Sensory development begins in utero and continues throughout the early years of life.  Building a sensory profile of each child is essential for a solid understanding of the child’s abilities and needs, developing a common framework for presentation of sensory information, and identifying necessary supports.

PRESENTER: Tanni Anthony, Ph.D Director, Access, Learning and Literacy

Please Register by NOON EASTERN day of Presentation 

REGISTER HERE: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_soIcXUNNRwWf00DysLWA3g

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TIME:  · 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm CT; · 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET

DESCRIPTION:
In this interactive session, we will discuss the role of a Deaf Mentor or Deaf Adult Role Model in the home and how they can be used to foster a love of reading from the start. In the book, Far From the Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity by Andrew Solomon, Solomon talks about how important it is to connect with others of the same identity. When supporting learning how to encourage fun and interactive reading experiences, it can be beneficial to have a Deaf Mentor's support. Using a Deaf person's point of view, a Deaf Mentor can point out subtle cues that naturally engage the child, no matter the age, with books and teach parents and providers how to capitalize on those cues. We will also present specific strategies that anyone can use when preparing to read with a deaf infant or toddler and we will provide books for hands on practice in applying these strategies. In addition, we will share specific templates and resources for families and providers to use to create READ Kits that can be used to foster a love of reading in any home.

Learning Objectives:
· The participant will be able to explain the role of a Deaf Mentor and how a Deaf Mentor can support reading/language development.
· The participant will be able to identify 3 strategies to use when reading with their deaf child.
· The participant will be able to develop a plan for activities to correspond with a chosen book.

PRESENTERS: Karla Giese, Michelle Mendiola, Karen Aguilar
Karla Giese, Illinois State University: Karla is a deaf adult, experienced in many modes of communication: written, spoken, signing, and cueing. She is an active advocate for deaf education and access to literacy for all deaf children and passionate about comprehensible communication access. Currently, Karla is the Coordinator of CHOICES for Parents, a statewide information, advocacy, referral and resource program for families of children who are deaf and hard of hearing. Karla is also a doctoral candidate at Illinois State University with a focus on deafness, early intervention, and parent support. Karla has worked with deaf and hard of hearing children of all ages, from birth to age 21, across all educational settings, and using all modes of communication. As a student of deaf education programs, a teacher in deaf education programs, and an administrator of deaf education programs, Karla has come full circle and enjoys sharing her experiences with others.

Michelle Mendiola, Chicago Hearing Society: Michelle Mendiola is a Deaf adult and is married to Jason McKinnie with three daughters, including Jayla and Jaede who are both hard of hearing. She is the Manager of the Community Outreach & Advocacy at the Chicago Hearing Society, a division of Anixter Center. Michelle oversees the Youth Program, Adult Role Models in Education of the Deaf (A.R.M.E.D.), and a statewide Deaf Mentor Program. Michelle's other job duties include providing counseling, crisis intervention, advocacy, information & referral to appropriate community resources for services, coordinating income tax assistance program and overseeing the Illinois Telecommunication Access Corporation (ITAC) Program and also CHOICES for Parents. Michelle has given numerous trainings and presentations on different Deaf-related topics. Michelle is personally and professionally active in the Deaf Community.

Karen Aguilar, Chicago Hearing Society: Ms. Aguilar is the Director of the Chicago Hearing Society, a division of Anixter Center, that provides social services and advocacy, youth programing and mentoring, a hearing health clinic and interpreter referral service throughout Illinois. CHS houses the CHOICES for Parents Coalition, Deaf Mentor Connections Program and Youth Program. Ms. Aguilar's past work includes creating a center based early intervention program for families and providing developmental therapy, service coordination and family support. Ms. Aguilar has a Masters of Jurisprudence in Health Law from Loyola University Chicago School of Law and has trained the legal community on the rights of persons who are deaf or hard of hearing, and educated the Deaf Community about their rights under state and federal laws. Ms. Aguilar has been signing since childhood and is a nationally-certified state-licensed sign language interpreter.

WHERE:  Adobe Connect- to register click: https://usu.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_cGVHG5pRBrwbP0x
**Important Notice: Adobe Connect has made some updates to their system. Please use the app and not your internet browser for full access, including the ability to see the captioning pod. The link to access the app is listed below.**

Download the adobeconnect app.

More download information is found at: https://helpx.adobe.com/adobe-connect/connect-downloads-updates.html

NOTE:  If your institution does not permit you to add the above link, you may go to the above URL directly, however, we have been advised that optimal performance is achieved via the app.

Live captioning will be provided

This webinar will be recorded and posted online at www.infanthearing.org about a week after the webinar. There are no CEU’s offered for the webinar.

If you have questions about this webinar, please contact Mandy Jay. For technical assistance during the webinar, please contact Daniel Ladner.