West

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We have planned an exciting evening with music by Nick Black, fabulous food from some of our area’s most outstanding restaurants, casino games, an online silent auction, and amazing live auction items!  After this long period of socially distanced, virtual fundraisers, don’t miss your chance to escape to the “Roaring 20’s”!  Every dollar raised will help the students at MOSD learn to listen and talk.  

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SayWhatClub is committed to providing a forum for the hard-of-hearing, deafened, and those otherwise concerned with hearing loss. We are dedicated to maintaining an environment promoting hope, self-worth, knowledge, and growth with consideration for individuals and the SWC community.

About the Convention: 
SayWhatClubbers have been gathering annually since 1996! The convention offers an opportunity for those who belong to our online community to meet face-to-face.  Family members are also welcome and encouraged to attend. Whether you are a part of our online groups, or not, you'll feel empowered by spending time with others who 'get' you, and who believe there is no right or wrong way to live with hearing loss and deafness.

Convention Registration Information:  https://www.saywhatclub.org/saywhatclub-convention/convention-registration/

Registration Fees:  
Early-bird registration fees are in effect until April 30, 2022. Fees are $200 for an individual SWC subscriber or $300 for a couple, or $225 for an individual non-subscriber of $350 for a couple. The registration fee includes the Wednesday evening Welcome Party, all Thursday and Friday workshops, and the Saturday evening banquet.

Hotel Information:  https://www.saywhatclub.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/Say-What-Club-Online-Booking-Link-12-10-2021.pdf

Scholarships (Deadline:  April 1, 2022):  https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1RHfFSQXRkycbEweggH_X0VC89knpsRoUcBWB9X2PjO4/viewform?ts=620812cf&edit_requested=true

Schedule-at-a-Glance and more information available on the website.
 

 

 

 

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Presented by: Teena Young, MS and Nicole Jacobson, MS, CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert. AVEd.

Webinar Description:

Parents of children who are deaf/hard of hearing can find understanding, support, and encouragement when they connect and build friendships with each other. These friendships can provide an anchor in times that may seem unsettled. Navigating a recent diagnosis or a new stage in a child’s development can be challenging, but connections made with other parents who have sailed a similar sea can provide parents with the resilience and knowledge needed to continue their efforts.

Join this webinar to discover the benefits of parent connections and learn how to promote and facilitate positive parent interactions and friendships.

Presenters Bios:

Teena Young is a teacher of the deaf in the preschool classroom at Sound Beginnings. She utilizes the Listening and Spoken Language approach to help her students reach individualized listening and language goals. She has taught in a preschool setting for seven years and enjoys helping children learn through play and exploration. Teena has a master’s degree in Communication Disorders and Deaf Education and a bachelor’s degree in Audiology.
   
Nicole Jacobson is a listening and spoken language specialist with a dual professional background as a speech-language pathologist and special educator. She has many years of experience working with children who are deaf or hard or hearing and their families in the Sound Beginnings program at Utah State University.

This presentation is most relevant to parents of children who are deaf or hard of hearing who use listening and spoken language and the professionals that serve them. All are invited to join us for this discussion.

This webinar will be recorded. Please see the website for access to this and other webinar recordings: http://www.heartolearn.org/communities/learning-together-archive.html

A certificate of completion is offered for participants of the live webinar broadcast.

CEUs are not offered for this webinar presentation.

Webinar start times (by time zone)

10:30 am – 11:00 am PT

11:30 am – 12:00 pm MT

12:30 pm – 1:00 pm CT

1:30 pm – 2:00 pm ET

Questions about this webinar: contact Stephanie Johnson. Technical assistance during the webinar: contact Gunnar Thurman

Once you have submitted the registration information, a confirmation email will be sent to your email address with the Zoom link to use for this webinar. Please contact Stephanie Johnson if you have not received a confirmation email two days prior to the webinar. Please Note: Another email will be sent to registrants one day prior to the webinar presentation with the Zoom link.

This webinar platform will be via a Zoom link. Once you have registered for the webinar, a Zoom link will be emailed to you. Please make sure the Zoom account you will be using is up to date. More information on how to update your account can be found here: Updating Zoom

Register here: https://usu.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_exhZrbzkEsyAiCG

There are no CEU’s offered for the webinar.

This webinar is being provided by the Early Hearing Detection and Intervention, National Technical Resource Center (EHDI NTRC) housed within the National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management at Utah State University. The work of the NTRC is funded in part by a cooperative agreement (U52MC04391) from the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) at the United States Department of Health and Human Services.

The National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management (NCHAM) at Utah State University (USU) is committed to promoting respectful dialogue about improving Early Hearing Detection and Intervention

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EARS Consortium is Back!

COMMUNICATION WITH EMERGENCY RESPONDERS

RSVP:  earsofmiddletn@gmail.com to get your Zoom link!

What experience have you had with communication in an emergency? We want to know! Tell us about any emergency that has to do with:

  • Fire
  • Ambulance
  • Police
  • Weather

There is a 3-minute limit to share your experience

Interpreters will be provided

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Presented by: Marianne Huish, M.Ed.

Learning Objectives:

Supporting Children in Extra-Curricular Activities is intended to support parents and caregivers of children who are Deaf/Hard of Hearing as they engage in extra-curricular activities…

· What does the environment look like (is it a dance studio? A soccer field?)

· What are common vocabulary words used in the activity (e.g. soccer: kleets, soccer ball, net, goal, positions of team members) and how can I help preteach important words and terms to my child?

· How can I support my child’s coach/instructor as they work with my child?

Presenter's Bio:

Marianne Huish is a Teacher of the Deaf in the kindergarten classroom at Sound Beginnings. She earned a master’s degree in communication disorders and deaf education at USU, with an emphasis in listening and spoken language. Prior to teaching in the classroom, Annie was a practicum supervisor through USU’s endorsement program, where she taught SLPs and Special Educators listening and spoken language strategies used in teaching children who are Deaf/Hard of Hearing. Annie also enjoyed stepping in occasionally at Sound Beginnings in roles that included teaching in the classroom setting. Annie and her husband enjoy raising their three young children in Cache Valley. They love gardening, hiking, swimming, and recently started recreational soccer. When asked what is important in her life, Annie will always say family and teaching are what matter most to her.

This presentation is most relevant to parents of children who are deaf or hard of hearing who use listening and spoken language and the professionals that serve them. All are invited to join us for this discussion.

This webinar will be recorded. Please see the website for access to this and other webinar recordings: http://www.heartolearn.org/communities/learning-together-archive.html

A certificate of completion is offered for participants of the live webinar broadcast.

CEUs are not offered for this webinar presentation.

Webinar start times (by time zone)

10:30 am – 11:00 am PT

11:30 am – 12:00 pm MT

12:30 pm – 1:00 pm CT

1:30 pm – 2:00 pm ET

Live captioning will be provided

Questions about this webinar: contact Lauri Nelson. Technical assistance during the webinar: contact Gunnar Thurman

Once you have submitted the registration information, a confirmation email will be sent to your email address with additional webinar participation/login information. Please contact Nicole Jacobson if you have not received a confirmation email two days prior to the webinar.

This webinar platform will be via a Zoom link. Once you have registered for the webinar, a Zoom link will be emailed to you. Please make sure the Zoom account you will be using is up to date. More information on how to update your account can be found here: Updating Zoom

Register here: https://usu.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bwGHICoEMKDlBuS

There are no CEU’s offered for the webinar.

This webinar is being provided by the Early Hearing Detection and Intervention, National Technical Resource Center (EHDI NTRC) housed within the National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management at Utah State University. The work of the NTRC is funded in part by a cooperative agreement (U52MC04391) from the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) at the United States Department of Health and Human Services.

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SOUTHEAST DEAFBLIND WEBINAR SERIES

TIME:  1:30 PM - 3:00 PM (CST)
             2:30 PM - 4:00 PM (EST)

This session will document a student's learning process about Supported Decision Making. It includes collaboration between the family and outside agencies to create accessible, meaningful materials for the student to participate fully in his future planning. During this session, participants will learn about the challenges and triumphs of pursuing Supported Decision Making. Presenters will also discuss where to start and how to follow the individual's lead. In addition, team members will demonstrate ways to individualize instruction to promote maximum participation.

REGISTER here  (https://us06web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_WP6HVtLTTnyB2ZK7cju5-g)

PRESENTERS:

Krista-Leigh Olsen is a Technical Assistant for the SC Statewide Deaf-Blind Project. She is also a certified Teacher of the Visually Impaired and has been working in Vision Impairment and Dual Sensory Loss for 13 years. She specializes in Communication, Assessment, and Transition. Ms. Olsen received her bachelor's degree in Visual Impairment from Florida State University. She was previously an itinerant Teacher of the Visually Impaired and Transition Instructor for students with visual impairment in South Florida. She has a passion for working with families, community organizations, and school teams.

Minnie is the mom of Andrew, a cool guy who is now 18 years old. Andrew was born with CHARGE Syndrome. Minnie is in year six as a Board Member of the CHARGE Syndrome Foundation and currently leads their Family Engagement Workgroup. She has worked for Family Connection of SC for the past nine years, SC's Parent Training and Information Center.  Minnie is currently a Family Engagement Manager, serves on the organizations' Educational Support Team, and specializes in students with Dual Sensory Loss. She spends some of her time working with the SC DBP providing a Parent Perspective. She is committed to helping other families like hers and believes that no parent should feel as though they are on this journey alone.

This is a joint program offered by the South Carolina School for the Deaf and Blind, Division of Outreach Services; Kentucky Deaf-Blind Project; and Tennessee Deaf-Blind Project.

The services of this program are provided under a grant from the US Department of Education, #H326T180055. However, those services do not necessarily represent the US Department of Education policy, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government. Project Officer Louise Tripoli.

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Presented by:  Amy Szarkowski, Beth Jones and Jennifer Clark.

Abstract/Description:

Fostering Joy brings together family members and professionals with the shared aim of finding, promoting, and celebrating “the joy in the journey” among families of children who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH), including children who are deaf with disabilities (DWD). This presentation, conducted jointly by a parent leader and two professionals, will address why it can be difficult for service providers to broach the topic of “joy” with families and some strategies for doing so. It will highlight some of the science of joy and associated states, such as gratitude and mindfulness, as well as discuss why a “focus on joy” is beneficial for families and the professionals who work with them. Further, the presentation will provide suggestions for supporting families in finding and cultivating joy in their everyday experiences, even – or perhaps especially - during challenging times.

As we strive to further grow an inclusive and inviting movement for all who are privileged to work with and know children who are DHH or DWD and their families, we invite you to join the Fostering Joy movement. All it takes is desire to ‘be mindful of being joyful’ and to ‘spread the word’ about the importance of fostering joy in whatever way works for you. Additional information will be provided for any family member or professional who wishes to delve deeper into this topic and engage more directly.

Learning Objectives:

· List at least two science-based benefits of focusing on and experiencing joy.

· Identify two strategies for discussing joy with families, whether as a professional or a parent leader.

· Describe two or more “implementable actions” to engage more fully with the Fostering Joy movement.

Presenters:

Amy Szarkowski is a psychologist who is passionate about working with and supporting children who are deaf or hard of hearing and their families. She obtained two bachelor’s degrees - in Psychology and a Health Promotion/Fitness Management - from Southern Oregon University. At Eastern Kentucky University, Szarkowski earned a master’s degrees in Clinical Psychology along with a Post-Graduate certificate in Providing Mental Health Services to Deaf/Hard of Hearing Persons. She earned master’s degrees in both Developmental Psychology and Administration & Supervision at Gallaudet University, as well as a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology. Dr. Szarkowski is a Director of The Institute and The Clinic at the Children’s Center for Communication/Beverly School for the Deaf (CCCBSD), LEND faculty at Boston Children’s Hospital, and Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.

Beth Jones is Executive Director for Nevada Hands & Voices, as well as serving as the Guide By Your Side Coordinator and an Educational Advocate for the ASTra Program. Prior to beginning a family, Beth earned her Master's degree in Special Education and worked as an Autism Teacher and Behavior Mentor Teacher. Beth became involved with Hands & Voices when two of her three children were identified as being deaf/hard of hearing, and has been a part of Nevada Hands & Voices since 2012. She serves on many state-wide and national committees, teams, and advisory boards as a parent leader to help advocate and support children who are deaf/hard of hearing.

Jennifer Clark, Early Childhood Deaf and Hard of Hearing Specialist, Hawaii Jennifer Clark received her Bachelor’s Degree in Communication Disorders and Deaf Studies: Sign Language Interpreting, from California State University, Fresno and her Master’s Degree from Gallaudet University in Deaf Education: Family Centered Early Education. Jennifer worked with D/HH/DB children (birth-3) as the Early Intervention Deaf and Hard of Hearing Specialist for the Hawaii Department of Health from 2010-2021.

Amy, Beth, and Jennifer are proud members of Core Team of Fostering Joy.

Webinar start times (by time zone)

· 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm PT

· 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm MT

· 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm CT

This webinar platform will be via a Zoom link. Once you have registered for the webinar, a Zoom link will be emailed to you. Please make sure the Zoom account you will be using is up to date. More information on how to update your account can be found here: Updating Zoom

Live captioning will also be provided.

This webinar will be recorded and posted online at www.infanthearing.org about a week after the webinar.

There are no CEU’s offered for the webinar.

If you have questions about this webinar, please contact Mandy Jay. For technical assistance during the webinar, please contact Daniel Ladner.

This webinar is being provided by the Early Hearing Detection and Intervention, National Technical Resource Center (EHDI NTRC) housed within the National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management at Utah State University. The work of the NTRC is funded in part by a cooperative agreement (U52MC04391) from the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) at the United States Department of Health and Human Services.

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Virtual Presentation with Lily Slavin

Doctoral Student at CMU with the CHARGE Syndrome Research Lab

This presentation will provide an overview of the educational experiences of students with CHARGE, including common special education eligibilities, programming, and services received. This presentation will discuss the 5 main domains of educational impact of CHARGE: medical, sensory, communication, developmental, and behavioral. This presentation will provide an overview of the Educational Checklist, a published tool used to aid in meeting the needs of students with CHARGE at school.

 

TIME

1:30 - 3:00 Central  2:30- 4:00 Eastern

HOSTS

The South Carolina Deaf-Blind Project

The Kentucky Deaf-Blind Project

The Tennesse Deaf- Blind Project

 

Biography:

  • Lily Slavin is a fifth-year doctoral candidate in the school psychology PhD program at Central Michigan University. She has worked as a member of the CHARGE Syndrome Research Lab with Tim Hartshorne since 2016. Her research focuses on educational needs and supports for students with CHARGE. She has presented her research to several DeafBlind projects and at CHARGE conferences in Germany, Norway, Australia, Florida, Texas, New York, and Cincinnati. Lily is currently completing her pre-doctoral internship at the Kennedy Krieger Institute

 

Register Here:  

by clicking

Questions or accommodation request, email Trtedder@scsdb.org

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Presented by:

Jeanette Smoot, MS, CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert. AVEd, and Sharon Fairbourn, MA, CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert. AVEd

Learning Objectives:

Ten Teaching Times Without Toys is intended to encourage parents and caregivers to recognize natural language opportunities in common household routines and/or inexpensive activities. Reducing reliance on specialized or costly materials and manipulatives increases carryover and generalization. These objectives align with Principles of Auditory Verbal therapy, particularly principles 4 through 7. (4-Guide and coach parents to become the primary facilitators of their child’s listening and spoken language development. 5-Guide and coach parents to create environments that support listening for the acquisition of spoken language throughout the child’s daily activities. 6-Guide and coach parents to help their child integrate listening and spoken language in all aspects of the child’s life. 7- Guide and coach parents to use natural developmental patterns of audition, speech, language, cognition, and communication.)

In this break out session, parents and professionals will explore:

· The critical importance of routine-based intervention

· Potentially hidden opportunities for language learning during a typical day or week

· Ways to increase or decrease complexity of language targets in similar settings and activities

· Create and maintain habits that foster a child’s language growt

This webinar will be recorded. Please see the website for access to this and other webinar recordings: http://www.heartolearn.org/communities/learning-together-archive.html

Presenters:

Jeanette Smoot holds a master's degree in Speech Language Pathology from Utah State University and is a certified Listening and Spoken Language Specialist. She has primarily worked with preschool and kindergarten aged children with hearing loss. Parent coaching and graduate student mentoring have been key parts of her role at Sound Beginnings for the past ten years. Jeanette enjoys finding creative ways to weave listening, language and speech goals into any setting or activity.

Sharon Fairbourn graduated from Utah State with her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Communicative Disorders and Deaf Education. Sharon is certified as a Listening Spoken Language Specialist. She has worked for Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Sound Beginnings Program at Utah State University. She has served birth to three, preschool and elementary aged children. She loves watching kids make connections and empowering parents with tools to succeed.

Webinar start times (by time zone)

10:30 am – 11:00 am PT

11:30 am – 12:00 pm MT

12:30 pm – 1:00 pm CT

1:30 pm – 2:00 pm ET

Webinar date: November 5, 2021

Where: Adobe Connect- to register click https://usu.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_5dJsIktuftzXu0C

Download the adobeconnect app.

For Windows: http://www.adobe.com/go/Connectsetup

For Mac: http://www.adobe.com/go/ConnectSetupMac

More download information is found at: https://helpx.adobe.com/adobe-connect/connect-downloads-updates.html

Note: If your institution does not permit you to add the above link, you may go to the above URL directly, however, we have been advised that optimal performance is achieved via the app.

Live captioning will also be provided.

There are no CEU’s offered for the webinar.

A certificate of completion is offered for participants of the live webinar broadcast.

If you have questions about this webinar, please contact Nicole Jacobson. For technical assistance during the webinar, please contact Daniel Ladner.

Registration Link: https://usu.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_5dJsIktuftzXu0C
 

This webinar is being provided by the Early Hearing Detection and Intervention, National Technical Resource Center (EHDI NTRC) housed within the National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management at Utah State University. The work of the NTRC is funded in part by a cooperative agreement (U52MC04391) from the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) at the United States Department of Health and Human Services.

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Presented by:  Molly Cooke, Carrie Davenport and Derek Houston

Abstract/Description:

The COVID-19 pandemic has seen an unprecedented shift of the workforce toward telework, a change which has the potential to significantly alter the early auditory environments of children whose parents work. For deaf and hard-of-hearing children, whose language acquisition and cognitive development outcomes may be more sensitive to variations in linguistic input, these changes may prove to be consequential. A recent study examining the effects of COVID-19 on gender equity (Alon, et al. 2020) posits an increase of paternal participation in childcare responsibilities in mother-father households due to men having greater access to and participation in occupational fields that would support working from home. In this project, we investigated the influence of the COVID-19 pandemic on parental linguistic input to children with hearing aids. Our team collected and analyzed 13 naturalistic recordings from 4 families of children with hearing aids using the Language Environment Analysis (LENA) system before and during the pandemic. All four families included a mother and a father and were of similar socio-economic status by parental education and income. Automated measures generated by LENA, including adult word count (AWC), female adult word count (FWC), and male adult word count (MWC) were extracted and compared. To account for variations in the durations of recordings, we normalized the measures by hour. There was an increase in average MWC/hr (156.80 pre-pandemic, 228.69 during) and in proportion MWC of AWC (17.81% pre-pandemic, 31.95% during). However, both average AWC/hr (1070.68 pre-pandemic, 773.86 during) and average FWC/hr (837.77 pre-pandemic, 545.16 during) decreased, which could help to explain part of the proportional uptick of MWC. These preliminary findings contribute to our understanding of how the COVID-19 pandemic may be affecting early linguistic environments, which can in turn inform evolving clinical practices relating to deaf and hard-of-hearing children (e.g. increased early intervention coaching for fathers).

Learning Objectives:

· Participants will be able to describe the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on parental linguistic input.

· Participants will be able to describe overall preliminary findings from this study.

· Participants will be able to describe clinical implications of these findings.

Presenters:

Molly Cooke is a research coordinator in the Department of Otolaryngology at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. She joined the research team at OSU in 2019 after earning her bachelor's degree in linguistics from Georgetown University, where she wrote her honors thesis on speech communities among adult cochlear implant users. She now works on projects studying language acquisition in deaf and hard-of-hearing infants and toddlers, particularly using the Language ENvironment Analysis (LENA) system.

Carrie Davenport, Ph.D., is a Postdoctoral Researcher in the Department of Otolaryngology at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. She earned her doctorate in special education at OSU in 2017. Prior to entering the PhD program at OSU, she was the Early Childhood Consultant for the Center for Outreach Services at the Ohio School for the Deaf. Carrie is a founding Board member of Ohio Hands & Voices. She currently serves on the steering committee for Children’s Hearing Language and Development Resource Network (CHLDRN) of Ohio.

Derek M. Houston, PhD, joined the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at The Ohio State University College of Medicine July 2015. He received his doctorate in psychology from Johns Hopkins University in 2000. His graduate training research focused on how normal hearing, typically developing infants segment words from fluent speech and recognize words across different talkers. After graduating, he moved to Indiana University School of Medicine and constructed the world's first laboratory to investigate the speech perception and language skills of deaf infants who receive cochlear implants. Since then, his work has investigated the effects of early auditory deprivation and subsequent cochlear implantation on speech discrimination, attention to speech, sensitivity to language-specific properties of speech, word learning, and general cognitive skills in deaf infants and toddlers. His research in Columbus, OH represents a collaborative effort between OSU and Nationwide Children's Hospital. His work is currently funded by the NIDCD.

Webinar start times (by time zone)

· 11:00 am - 12:00 pm PT

· 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm MT

· 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm CT

· 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm ET

Where: Adobe Connect- to register click here.

http://infanthearing.org/webinars/2021/increased-paternal-linguistic-input.html

Download the adobeconnect app.

For Windows: http://www.adobe.com/go/Connectsetup

For Mac: http://www.adobe.com/go/ConnectSetupMac

More download information is found at: https://helpx.adobe.com/adobe-connect/connect-downloads-updates.html

Note: If your institution does not permit you to add the above link, you may go to the above URL directly, however, we have been advised that optimal performance is achieved via the app.

Live captioning will also be provided.

This webinar will be recorded and posted online at www.infanthearing.org about a week after the webinar. There are no CEU’s offered for the webinar.

If you have questions about this webinar, please contact Mandy Jay . For technical assistance during the webinar, please contact Daniel Ladner.

There are no CEU’s offered for the webinar.

This webinar is being provided by the Early Hearing Detection and Intervention, National Technical Resource Center (EHDI NTRC) housed within the National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management at Utah State University. The work of the NTRC is funded in part by a cooperative agreement (U52MC04391) from the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) at the United States Department of Health and Human Services.